Visit FamilyCorner.com for tons of seasonal ideas!
quick link - go to our home page quick link - kid's crafts, family fun, printables, etc quick link - sign up for our free newsletter quick link - holiday crafts, recipes and ideas quick link - gardening, organizing, saving money, decorating and more quick link - our FunBook is filled with lots of quick ideas, tips and crafts quick link - join our bustling community of friendly members


Go Back   FamilyCorner.com Forums >

Travel & Vacations Family travel and vacation ideas, fun activities, movie night, game nights, plenty of ideas for fun and relaxation.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 3 votes, 5.00 average.
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2004, 08:57 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
Lancaster County

It's Different in Dutch Country

Winner of a 2001 Family-Friendly Travel Award! Lancaster, PA is the second best family destination in America, according to FamilyFun magazine readers who selected Lancaster, PA as the #2 Top Pick Tourist Town in the nation. Come find out what others already know - fun feels different here in Lancaster County, The Heart of Pennsylvania Dutch CountrySM!

There's more than one century at play here. Explore our back roads and byways, farm lanes and riverbanks, and you'll find yourself enjoying a past that's still vibrantly present along with all the excitement of today's adventures and attractions. That's really the magical part. Enjoy the fun of two worlds in one. Lancaster County. The Heart of Pennsylvania Dutch CountrySM.

History liked it so much here, it never left.
There are over 25 museums to meander through as well as mansions and gardens to explore. Landmarks and landscapes from centuries past beckon still. We even have a Presidential estate and communities where "modern life" rolls by ... without automobiles, jangling telephones, or electricity.

Listen as hustle and bustle fades to clippety-clop.
No matter where you are in Lancaster County, you're only a short, scenic drive from some of the most captivating country in the country. Suddenly, you're in another time, another world. One just waiting to be explored. Whether you explore the countryside or you take a carriage ride, you'll be able to enjoy the beautiful scenery and heritage of the Pennsylvania Dutch Country.

Relax, you're among friends.
Visiting with us isn't just a matter of getting away from it all. It's about getting back to it all and discovering the honest charm of simple, homespun pleasures. That charm is everywhere you look within our Plain Sect communities. Here, buggies amble down country roads. Children play outside one room schoolhouses, and farm stands showcase crafts, quilts, and the world's best shoofly pie.
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2004, 09:01 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
The Amish

Part of Lancaster County's old-fashioned charm and homespun warmth stems from our Amish population -- the families, farmers and craftsmen who follow a deeply religious, family-centered lifestyle that has maintained this tradition through a simple way of life that has not adopted the mainstream culture, yet has adapted in many necessary ways throughout the last 300 years.

Forgoing "outside world" luxuries, the Amish who grace our small towns and farmlands present a fascinating and authentic horse-and-buggy contrast to the hustle and bustle of the 21st century.

Amish Beliefs
Actually, there are three families or Anabaptist-related groups found in Lancaster County: the Amish, the Mennonites, and the Brethren. All three groups share the Anabaptist belief that calls for making a conscious choice to accept God. (Accordingly, only adults are baptized.)


The three groups also share the same basic values concerning the all-encompassing authority of the Bible, a philosophy of brotherhood and non-resistance, and the importance of family and community.

The groups differ primarily in matters of dress, language, forms of worship, and the extent to which they allow modern technology and the forces of the "outside world" to impact their lives. Most Brethren and Mennonites dress much like their "English" neighbors. Other Mennonites, Brethren and Amish Mennonites wear distinctive Amish clothing but may make use of "worldly" conveniences -- such as cars, electricity and telephones. On the other hand, Old Order Mennonite and Old Order Amish groups are more restrictive in their views of modern technology, with the Old Order Amish being the most conservative of Lancaster County's "plain" groups.

For the sake of simplicity, the following information refers primarily to the Old Order Amish:

The Amish Lifestyle
On the surface, the Amish lifestyle might appear to be staid and inflexible. However, it reflects a way of life that is based on a literal interpretation of the Bible, as well as unwritten rules from the Amish Ordnung that prescribes behavior, appearance and other aspects of the Amish culture.

Please note: Most Amish consider posing for photographs to be an unacceptable act of pride. For this reason, visitors are respectfully requested to refrain from taking photos or video images of the Amish.

The Amish Style of Dress
The characteristic Amish style of dress is the most obvious outward manifestation of their faith.

Amish men wear dark-colored suits, straight-cut coats with no lapels, broadfall trousers, suspenders, solid-colored shirts, black socks and shoes, and black or straw broad-brimmed hats. Shirts fasten with conventional buttons; suit coats and vests fasten with hooks and eyes. Men do not wear mustaches and generally wait until after marriage to grow beards.

Amish women wear modest, solid-colored dresses, usually with long sleeves and a full skirt, a cape and apron. The clothing is fastened with straight pins or snaps. Hair is never cut and is worn in a bun on the back of the head, concealed by a prayer covering. Single women in their teens and twenties wear black prayer coverings for church services; a white covering is worn at most times by women of all ages. Amish women are not permitted to wear jewelry or printed fabrics.

On the Amish Farm
While farming was not an integral tenet of Anabaptism, agriculture has always been a major part of the Amish lifestyle. Believing that practical knowledge, hard work and long hours are the "technological marvels" that make farm life fruitful, they practice impressive levels of thrift and self-sufficiency which they believe are mandated by the Bible. Accordingly, they attribute their successes in farming to divine blessing.


The Amish and Technology
In the Amish view, "progress" is not assumed to mean "something better." Amish do not fully accept the modern conveniences that non-Amish take for granted. While it is accepted within Amish communities to use some electricity in limited forms, such as battery power for the lights on their buggies, and some machinery, such as tractors without rubber tires, most elements from mainstream society -- such as electricity throughout their homes, TV, computer, and modern tractors -- are considered to be tempting elements from an "outside world" that could lead them away from their close-knit community or weaken the family structure.


Schooling
Amish children attend school only up to the eighth-grade level. (In 1972, the U.S. Supreme Court exempted them from compulsory school attendance beyond the eight grade, based on religious precepts.)

The Amish build and maintain their own church-funded, one-room schoolhouses, where children study reading, writing, English, math, geography, history, German, music, art, and the Bible.

As the Amish believe that classroom learning represents only half of the knowledge needed to make one's way as an adult, farming and homemaking skills are an extremely important part of an Amish child's education.

Language
At home and in their community, the Amish speak a dialect of German. This language, originally known as Pennsylvania Deutsch, has gradually became known as Pennsylvania Dutch. Amish children learn English at school and also study High German for worship services.

The Amish Family
The family is the most important social unit among the Amish; families with seven to ten children are not uncommon. In the past twenty years, the Amish population in Lancaster County has doubled to approximately 22,000.

Worship
While the Amish consider themselves to be Christians, they do not attend churches in the traditional sense. Instead, they take turns holding three-hour services in each others' homes every other Sunday. Worship services are solemn; hymns are sung slowly, in German, without musical accompaniment or harmony. Scripture reading and sermons in High German follow.

The Amish are a private people who believe that God has called them to a simple life of faith, discipline, dedication and humility. Their conviction that God has a personal and abiding interest in their lives, families and communities is the force that holds them together in spite of the pressures of the outside world.


To learn more about the Amish:http://www.padutchcountry.com/about_.../the_amish.asp
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2004, 09:03 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
The Underground Railroad

Background

For thousands of men and women fleeing the opression of slavery, the Underground Railroad became their lifeline, their passage to freedom. Known alternatively as the Freedom Line, the Lightning Train, the Freedom Train, Mysterious Tracks, or the Trackless Train, the Underground Railroad wasn't a system of rails or trains but a loose organization of freed slaves and abolitionists -people- who harbored fugitives often at great peril to themselves. The federal Fugitive Slave Law of 1850 made assisting of fugitives a crime, and anti-abolitionist sentiment made life unsafe for freed blacks and white sympathizers alike. The entire movement was shrouded in mystery, but the place of its birth has been alternately placed in Ohio and Pennsylvania. Even the origin of the term "Underground Railroad" is much disputed. Some sources indicate that as slave catchers came north, their quarry seemed to disappear underground and the term "Underground Railroad" was born.

The road to freedom was paved - with acts of heroism and courage. Three of these hard-made paths made their way through Lancaster County. The county's location along the Mason-Dixon line, its residents' devotion to freedom, and its proximity to other free Northern states made it ideal as a pathway to freedom. Some fugitives made their way to Columbia, others crossed the Susquehanna River into Southern Lancaster County at Peach bottom, and still others followed a path that lead them along the Octoraro Creek in the eastern portion of the county. Regardless the path, their destination was often Christiana and eventually, Philadelphia or Canada.

As many as 50,000 to 100,000 men and women escaped to freedom using the Underground Railroad network, but the exact number will never be known - many of the ledgers documenting their flight were destroyed. Oral histories and some records did survive, however, and these are enough to give us an idea of how slaves made their way north. Songs like Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, Brother Moses Gone to de Promised Land, Wade In The Water and Follow the Drinkin' Gourd served as directions for fugitives to follow. Using ingenious disguises and creative ploys (like one slave who mailed himself to freedom or others who hid in the false bottoms of wagons), slaves made their way out of bondage. Yet no story of the Underground Railroad would be complete without mention of the men and women who acted as "conductors" and "Stationmasters" along the pathway to freedom.


For more information:http://www.padutchcountry.com/about_...d_railroad.asp
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2004, 09:10 PM
Irish Angel's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Chambersburg,Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,476
You are absolutely right, central PA has alot to offer! Many activities are very economic or free even~

There is also Gettysburg, Hershey and other places in the area as well around 1 hour from Lancaster County!
__________________
Hugs and Blessings,
Cathy


Admit your mistakes so that NO ONE else can exaggerate them
You can NOT amputate your HISTORY from your DESTINY~ Beth Moore
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2004, 09:15 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
Answers to Frequently Asked Questions

The Amish of Lancaster County

Who are the Amish? Are they the same as the Pennsylvania Dutch?
The Amish are a religious group who live in settlements in 20 states and Ontario, Canada. The oldest group of Old Order Amish, about 22,000 people live in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The Amish stress humility, family and community, and separation from the world. Although Lancaster Amish are Pennsylvania Dutch, all Pennsylvania Dutch are not Amish. The Pennsylvania Dutch are natives of Central Pennsylvania, particularly Lancaster and its surrounding counties. Unlike the Amish, they are not all one religion. Instead, their common bond is a mainly German background (Pennsylvania Dutch is actually Pennsylvania Deutsch, or German). They also have Welsh, English, Scottish, Swiss, and French ancestry.

What is the history of the Amish?
The Amish have their roots in the Mennonite community. Both were part of the early Anabaptist movement in Europe, which took place at the time of the Reformation. The Anabaptists believed that only adults who had confessed their faith should be baptized, and that they should remain separate from the larger society. Many early Anabaptists were put to death as heretics by both Catholics and Protestants, and many others fled to the mountains of Switzerland and southern Germany. Here began the Amish tradition of farming and holding their worship services in homes rather than churches.

In 1536, a young Catholic priest from Holland named Menno Simons joined the Anabaptist movement. His writings and leadership united many of the Anabaptist groups, who were nicknamed “Mennonites.” In 1693, a Swiss bishop named Jacob Amman broke from the Mennonite church. His followers were called the “Amish.” Although the two groups have split several times, the Amish and Mennonite churches still share the same beliefs concerning baptism, non-resistance, and basic Bible doctrines. They differ in matters of dress, technology, language, form of worship, and interpretation of the Bible.

The Amish and Mennonites both settled in Pennsylvania as part of William Penn's "holy experiment" of religious tolerance. The first sizable group of Amish arrived in Lancaster County in the 1720's or 1730's.

The Amish seem stuck in history. Why don't they accept modern ideas and innovations?
Although the Amish look like they stepped out of the rural nineteenth century, in fact they do change. Their lives move more slowly than ours, but they definitely are not stuck anywhere. They choose to examine change carefully before they accept it. If the new idea or gadget does not assist in keeping their lives simple and their families together, they probably will reject it. Each church district decides for itself what it will and will not accept; there is no single governing body for the entire Old Order population, but all follow a literal interpretation of the Bible and an unwritten set of rules called the Ordnung.

Old Order groups all drive horses and buggies rather than cars, do not have electricity in their homes, and send their children to private, one-room schoolhouses. Children attend only through the eighth grade. After that, they work on their family's farm or business until they marry. The Amish feel that their children do not need more formal education than this. Although they pay school taxes, the Amish have fought to keep their children out of public schools. In 1972, the Supreme Court handed down a landmark unanimous decision, which exempted the Old Order Amish and related groups from state compulsory attendance laws beyond the eighth grade. Many Mennonites and progressive Amish do attend high school and even college.

Why do they dress that way?
Old Order Amish women and girls wear modest dresses made from solid-colored fabric with long sleeves and a full skirt (not shorter than half-way between knee and floor). These dresses are covered with a cape and apron and are fastened with straight pins or snaps. They never cut their hair, which they wear in a bun on the back of the head. On their heads they wear a white prayer covering at most times and a black one for church if they are single. Amish women do not wear jewelry.

Men and boys wear dark-colored suits, straight-cut coats without lapels, broadfall trousers, suspenders, solid-colored shirts, black socks and shoes, and black or straw broad-brimmed hats. Their shirts fasten with conventional buttons, but their suit coats and vests fasten with hooks and eyes. They do not have mustaches, but they grow beards after they marry.

The Amish feel these distinctive clothes encourage humility and separation from the world. Their clothing is not a costume; it is an expression of their faith.

Do they speak English?
Most Amish are trilingual. At home and in their community, the Amish speak a dialect of German. This language, originally known as Pennsylvania Deutsch, has gradually became known as Pennsylvania Dutch. They study High German for worship services and speak English when they deal with anyone who is not Amish. They pronounce Amish with a broad "a" (Ah-mish).

The Amish are a private people who believe God has kept them together despite pressure to change from the modern world. They are not perfect, but they are a strong example of a community that supports and cares for its members. They are a people apart; they are also a people together.

SOURCES:

20 Most Asked Questions About the Amish and Mennonites
by Merle and Phyllis Good.
Copyright 1979 by Good Books, Main Street, Intercourse, PA 17534.

The Puzzles of Amish Life
by Donald B. Kraybill.
Copyright 1990 by Good Books, Intercourse, PA 17534.

"Lancaster County Amish: Their Lifestyle, Beliefs & Heritage"
Pennsylvania Dutch Convention and Visitors Bureau,
501 Greenfield Rd., Lancaster, PA 17601.
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 03-20-2004, 09:19 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
Morelia92, You beat me to it, I was just about to add this......







The Region Just Next Door...

All the fun won't fit in one county. Explore the Heart of Pennsylvania and discover why the memories last a lifetime.

Truth is, all the things to see and do won't fit in one county. So it's good to know there's even more to explore nearby. Tour awe-inspiring battlefields. Meander through historic mansions and museums. Take in some world-class theme parks, restaurants and shopping adventures. You'll discover why Pennsylvania memories last a lifetime. And it's all just a short sightseeing trip from your Lancaster County home base in the Heart of Pennsylvania Dutch Country.

Destinations:
Gettysburg: www.gettysburg.com
Hershey: www.hersheypa.com
Philadelphia: www.pcvb.org
Philadelphia: www.gophila.com
Reading: www.readingberkspa.com
York: www.yorkpa.org
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 07-19-2004, 05:26 AM
Irish Angel's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Chambersburg,Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,476
Hello gang...

found out something REALLY interesting that actually shocked me.

Chambersburg.. the lovely lil' town I live in... is supposed to be right after Philadelphia in historical significance even ahead of Gettysburg . I found that out over the weekend with the opening of of HERITAGE CENTER.
Although a significant battle happened in Gettysburg that was the only thing.
The confederates burned Chambersburg to the ground because we were the only town that refused to pay ransom. The underground railroad was significant here and the first ever night baseball game was played here. There is lots more... but I am not that big of a historian.
This week is our annual CHAMBERSFEST. It is the 140th anniversary of when our town was burned to the ground. Loosing 141 structures.

I can find the link to this info if any one is interested.
__________________
Hugs and Blessings,
Cathy


Admit your mistakes so that NO ONE else can exaggerate them
You can NOT amputate your HISTORY from your DESTINY~ Beth Moore
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 07-19-2004, 07:56 AM
mom2-4's Avatar
Moderator
FamilyCorner Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: PA
Posts: 3,350
Re: The Amish

Quote:
Originally posted by ajrsmom
The groups differ primarily in matters of dress, language, forms of worship, and the extent to which they allow modern technology and the forces of the "outside world" to impact their lives. Most Brethren and Mennonites dress much like their "English" neighbors. Other Mennonites, Brethren and Amish Mennonites wear distinctive Amish clothing but may make use of "worldly" conveniences -- such as cars, electricity and telephones. On the other hand, Old Order Mennonite and Old Order Amish groups are more restrictive in their views of modern technology, with the Old Order Amish being the most conservative of Lancaster County's "plain" groups.
Not to, be ignorant. But, to nitpick.

Actually, the Brethern religion, is nowadays, much different than the Amish and Mennonite!

Young Brethern approx age 60 and under. Dress like the rest of the world, only a few select Brethern still dress as the Mennonite. Brethern woman are allowed to attend church without a covering, and wear pants and/or jeans to attend church. This would not be allowed in a Mennonite church. The older order Brethern are considered unbiblical if not wearing their covering, which now most never wear a covering.

Just a little inside info. on the PA dutch, Mennonite/Amish. Though modern conviences are not permissible in the home. Many have an outhouse with a working phone in it.

Also, this is a good one. When a young mennonite/amish girls covering is removed, they are allowed to do anything I find that very amusing.

Just a few interesting inside facts about the Brethern, Amish and Mennonite.

Oh, I am Brethern, and never realized that I am considered that closely to a mennonite/amish!

Last edited by mom2-4; 07-19-2004 at 08:00 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 07-19-2004, 10:56 AM
Irish Angel's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Chambersburg,Pennsylvania
Posts: 1,476
Hi Karen...

We are Brethren In Christ. Our pastor comes from an Amish background.
Maggy just discovered the Amish "rumschpringe" for the teens. Boy if you want to know about the Amish teens crazy days that is the thing to investigate. Just Kidding.
Seriously it is a time before they join the Amish church in baptism to date in secret.. and decide if they would prefer to accept Amish life or live as Englishers.

I believe ( I could be wrong) that the Brethren that the article Tami posted could be the River Brethren. They are a sect of plain folks. It gets really technical because there are old order and new order Mennonite and Amish.

Just my 2 cents for my sisters!
__________________
Hugs and Blessings,
Cathy


Admit your mistakes so that NO ONE else can exaggerate them
You can NOT amputate your HISTORY from your DESTINY~ Beth Moore
Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
County Fair Time Joy Family Time 20 09-18-2014 02:19 AM
State or County Fairs!!! trainlady Idle Chit Chat! 35 08-11-2010 11:44 PM
Rockingham County/ Reidsville--What can you tell me about the area? ajrsmom States 11 05-12-2005 08:01 PM
Champaign County, IL Events & Attractions barbszy States 1 03-16-2005 03:50 PM
July 2004 Events - Champaign County happyhomeschooler States 0 02-19-2004 06:46 AM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:39 PM.


Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

POPULAR AREAS OF FAMILYCORNER.COM

Our Family FunBook is packed full of ideas from parents just like you!

Our members say that they have never found a friendlier message board community than ours!

Our kid's craft section is filled with easy ideas for creative little minds.

We have tons of free printable coloring pages to keep your little ones happy.

We offer a wide variety of free newsletters delivered right to your inbox.

Our Household Hints & Tips have a wealth of information on cleaning, organizing, and more!
Go to the funbook Go to forums Go to kid's crafts Go to printables Go to newsletters Go to Hints & Tips

Home || Newsletters || Advertising || Terms of Use || Privacy || Services || Submissions || Contact Us || Media Opportunities || Link To Us || Shop || Feedback || Staff || e-Cards || Reminder Service



FamilyCorner.com® is sponsored in part by...




Visit our friends --> MomsMenu | Main Street Mom | She Knows | Baby University | Personal Fitness Zone | iChef.com

Copyright Notice | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use/Disclaimer