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Old 10-08-2004, 02:35 PM
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Baby food, homemade

I know there are some frugal FC members out there. Someone is bound to be making homemade baby food or at least HAVE done it. I am thinking of making my own baby food and was wondering if anyone had any tips for storage, freezing, preparing tips, etc.
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Old 10-15-2004, 11:12 PM
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I would boil whatever veggies or fruits for the day then puree. I used to make enough where I could pour them into icecube trays, freeze, then take them out and put them in ziploc baggies. That way you could unfreeze whatever amount you were going to use for the day.
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Old 10-16-2004, 06:02 AM
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I made a lot of my own baby food as well. My advice is get a good food processor. Babies can eat just about any kind of vegetable or fruit we eat as long as there are not a lot of additives like salt, sugar, etc. I also purchased a couple great babyfood recipe books. One was called "Baby Let's Eat". I bet you could also find some great recipes online too.
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Old 10-16-2004, 06:08 AM
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It has been sooo long ago that I did that, but it is a good money saving way to go and you can also KNOW what is in your baby's food! My two sons are grown 27 and 25 now, but I did a lot of their food when they were babies. Here is what I did.

I always bought fresh veggies and steamed them more done than you normally steam veggies then pureed them in my blender. A little goes a long way. Then I also did the old fashioned ice cube tray method. But I covered the ice cube trays with either foil or plastic wrap to keep from ice crystals forming on it. Once frozen pop into quart size freezer bags and label and just heat in your own method. I used a egg poacher pan that had 3 separate compartments. I did this with veggies and fruit. I also steamed lamb, hamburger, ground pork or whatever meat you want them to haveand then pureed it Back then egg yolks three times a week was good, now I don't know, but if you want to serve them just hard boil eggs the morning or night before you need them and grind up with a little baby formula when you are ready to serve them. I also did oatmeal for their cereal, grind the dried oatmeal up before you cook it. It will make almost a flour consistency and then add baby formula. I cheated some and as they got older used cream of wheat, and etc that you can buy much more econmocial than the baby cereals.

As they garduated to more "meals" I would prepare some dinners by taking some of our meals and blending them up (usually before I added all the spices) and doing the ice cube tray thing again. I even did soups for them this way so they could eat soups with all the goodies, but before they were ready for chunky meal foods.

I'm sure there are books now in book strores on making meals for babies, but these methods work well and much easier than all that extra preparing. Just take a couple days a month and you can fix a month or so ahead! Good Luck!


Last edited by cat lover; 10-16-2004 at 06:11 AM.
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Old 10-16-2004, 07:16 AM
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My dd is just turning thirty and so it was a long time ago for me, as well. Financial necessity at the time lead me to experiment and decide that what's good for us was better for her. I only had my old blender, but would throw in whatever we had for supper, plus enough liquid to whip it into the right consistency. That may have been anything from gravy to broths etc. I never even separated the parts of the meal, but put the meat, veggies and stuff all together and let it blend. I froze it in old baby food jars and on days that we had something like chili, dd had her choice of more 'friendly' meals from the freezer. I would taste it and it was quite good. I gradually introduced her to spaghetti and such by just slightly coating the noodles at first, before blending and monitoring activity at the other end to make sure the seasonings were okay.

I thought those 'off the shelf' ones tasted horrible. My cooking was much healthier and tasty.

To top it off, dd is a professional cook, now!
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Old 10-16-2004, 11:34 AM
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Making baby food is fun! I would take a bunch of carrots, or a bag of frozen veggies, cook them, then use the blender or the food processor to puree them. I had 4 ice cube trays just for baby food. I'd freeze it, then pop them into freezer bags.

For meat, I'd cook it with no seasoning, then add some applesauce when processing it (otherwise it turned out too thick - like pate). We'd always have a row of labeled bags in the freezer.

DH loved it, because when he was feeding baby, he could just grab a cube or two of meat and veggies, pop them in the microwave, and be ready to feed. A cube is about 1 oz.of food. It saved us tons of $$.
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Old 10-16-2004, 12:59 PM
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I also am currently making baby food. I use the ice tray method and then put in freezer bags sooooo easy!
I did it for ds1 as well, but I never purreed meat....As for spagetti I started with I think orzo pasta???? When ds2 is 9 months I will get that all started. I dont know if homemade babyfood was the reason but ds1 is a great eater!
BTW Fran when and what did you have??? I am just starting to get back here I think I have missed lots! Congrads to you!
Leighann
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Old 10-16-2004, 03:12 PM
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Making homemade baby foods is so easy! All the above posts are what I did (steam, boil, baked, freeze). The only thing was that I had trouble finding a good food processor, but my upstairs lady let me borrow her food grinder when I had my first baby. When it was near time for my second baby to begin on solids, I searched for that food grinder, but I couldn't find it anywhere in stores. I did find it online and it only like $12. It's non-electrical, but in my opinion, it works better than food processors. All you do is steam or bake or boil the foods (veggies, fruits, even beef and chicken) then place it in this grinder. You push it down while turning the handle. The food comes out in a perfect mode for a baby. I found the food processor didn't chop up or grind the foods small enough to where I would be comfortable feeding my 5-month old child.

You can cook several items and freeze in ice trays. I used this freezing method and only had to cook once a month. I used this method to test for allergies and once the baby tried all the foods, I mixed and matched. Very easy, very convenient.

I made homemade baby food for both my kids and started them around age 4 or 5 months. I did buy this one book that I just thought was the greatest. It's called Mommy Made and Daddy Too! Home Cooking For a Healthy Baby and Toddler by Martha and David Kimmel. This is an excellent resource book and includes recipes that can be enjoyed by the whole family. It also has a chart of when the best time would be to feed certain foods because there are some foods you need to watch due to the baby's digestive system not being fully developed. Like honey, you need to wait until after the baby turns one before giving her/him honey.

Cooking homemade baby food is SO easy and much cheaper, I don't know why everybody doesn't do it. And most importantly, you have control on what goes in your baby, at least until they get too picky. Have fun!
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Old 10-16-2004, 04:15 PM
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moonlight7275, just welcoming you to the site, come on over to What's For Dinner also, we have lots of fun over there and always enjoy sharing recipes!



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Old 10-17-2004, 01:09 PM
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I never "made" baby food, but never bought any, either. I nursed exclusively until each baby was about 5-8 months old. By then they were getting toofies, so I'd just "fork mash" a little of whatever we were having and give it to the baby. I'd "overcook" a few string beans and give them to the baby. He (or she!) would play with it, munch on it, chase it around the tray, mash it in his hair, etc., but a little would go down, and they'd eventually get the idea. ISTM that going through all the pureeing and freezing, and thawing and cooking and ..... well, it was just too much for me to deal with! I'm sooooooo lazy! The kids learned to eat whatever was presented to them, and they fed themselves pretty much from the get-go. Bathtime was right after supper, anyway, so they'd get all the food in the hair washed out.

Good luck!

Cheerio!
Elizabeth
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