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  #1 (permalink)  
Old 09-26-2008, 11:29 PM
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Postcard Facts and Figures.

Deltiology


Deltiolgy, the formal name in the U.S. for postcard collecting, is currently the third largest collectable hobby in the world. It is surpassed only by coin and stamp collecting (in the U.S. baseball collecting is greater, but that is a national past-time not worldwide). The popularity of post cards can be attributed to their broad subject appeal. Almost any subject imaginable has been, at some time, portrayed on a postcard. The broad subject range comes as a result of the social usage cards were designed for. Postcards continue today to be the most popular form of souvenir for travelers as well as economical means of communication both personal and business related. BELOW: Click on links to view pictures, then use your back button to return.
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Old 09-26-2008, 11:33 PM
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Important Events in Postcard History

1861 - The Lipman's Postal Card, 'COPY-RIGHT SECURED 1861', Philadelphia.
1869, October 1 - Austria issued the world's first postal card. In the next few years, Austria's example was followed by many other countries: Switzerland (1870), Belgium (1871), Spain (1873), Italy (1873), Greece (1876), most of Scandinavia.
1870, October 1 - Britain issued first postal card, for use in that country only.
1871, June - Canada (the first non-European country) issued their first postal card.
1871-72 - The second edition Lipman card.
1872 - The first Russian postcard.
1873, January 15 - France issued their first postal card (120 x 78 mm).
1873 - Germany issued first official postal cards.
1873 - The first U.S. government postal card, one cent rate, including the imprinted stamp.
1873, June - Romania issued their first postal card (CARTA DE POSTA).
1873, December - Japan's first postcard was issued. See year year conversion table for Japanese postmarks.
1875 - General Postal Union was formed, at a meeting held in Berne, Switzerland.
1875, July 1 - Britain issued their first postal card for foreign use.
1878 - Universal Postal Union (UPU) congress held in Paris.
1878 - France issued first official postal cards (140 x 90 mm).
1882 - The first commemorative postcard was issued in Germany for the Nuremberg Exhibition.
1889 - Pictorial card showing the Eiffel Tower, engraved by Léon-Charles Libonis.
1890 - Gruss Aus (Greetings from) cards.
1893 - The World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago. The first commercially produced pictorial card.
1894 - Britain issued first picture postcards.
1897 - Heinrich von Stephan died in Berlin, having made a profound impact on the standardization of mail service worldwide.
1899 - Raphael Tuck & Sons issued their first postcards.
1900 - The World's Exposition in Paris.
1902 - Great Britain became the first country to allow divided back cards, allowing senders to write both a message and the recipient's address on the back of the card.
1920 - Art Deco designs.
NOTE: Divided backs appeared in 1902 in England, 1904 in France, 1905 in Germany, and 1907 in the US.
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Old 09-27-2008, 03:02 PM
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Very cool Kathy thanks for all the info...very interesting

Hugs debbie
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Old 09-27-2008, 04:35 PM
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History itself can be tracked on postcards, from historical buildings, famous people, art, holidays and more.

The First Postage Stamp
1840

The Penny Black which was issued in England in 1840 is the world's first adhesive postage stamp. The stamp has a portrait of Queen Victoria, is primarily black in color and is one cent, so it has become to be known as the Penny Black.
Before 1840 postage rates varied as they were dependent on how many sheets of paper were used and how far the distance sent. The postage was also not paid by the sender, but by the receiver. Postage was at that time quite expensive and many times the receivers refused the deliveries.
In 1837 the Postmaster General of England, Sir Rowland Hill, proposed several different reforms of the postal system including postage being paid by the sender, a set rate anywhere in England and proof of prepayment of the postage.
Sir Hill's proposed systems were passed by Parliament in 1839, called the Penny Postage Act and shortly thereafter the first Penny Black was issued. The first Penny Black for sold on May 1st, 1840. There was also a two penny stamp, which was identical with the exception of it was blue in color. The two cent stamp was issued for any mail weighing more than 1/2 an ounce. The first blue two cent stamp was sold on May 8th, 1840.
To prevent forgery, the stamps had watermarks of a small crown on the back and they were printed on large sheets each containing 240 stamps. They were cut apart by scissors until perforated stamps were issued in 1854.
For proof of payment and that the stamp had been used, the cancellation mark came to be. Originally the cancellation mark was made with black ink, but being hard to see on a black stamp it was later changed to red.
Adhered postage stamps proved to be very popular and soon many other countries in Europe began producing stamps. The first postage stamp in the United States was issued in 1847. The first two stamps were five and ten cents depicting Benjamin Franklin on the five cent stamp and George Washington on the ten cent stamp.
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Old 10-03-2008, 01:12 PM
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Pre-Postcard Era
1840 - 1869

Before postcards came the lithograph prints, woodcuts and small cards that were the predecessor of the "mailed" postcard. They were primarily hand delivered. Another direct ancestor seems to be the envelopes printed with pictures on them. These first envelopes were produced by D. William Mulready, E.R.W. Hume, Dickey Doyle, and James Valentine.
The private postal card was developed by John P. Charlton of Philadelphia in 1861 for which he obtained the copyright which was later transferred to H.L. Lipman. The cards were adorned with a small border and labeled "Lipman's Postal Card, Patent Applied For". They were on the market until 1873 when the first Government Postcards appeared.
Plain postcards were used prior to the Lipman postcard and were issued by individual countries with that country's stamp affixed upon them. These cards were referred to as "Postals".
The first "non-Postal" postcard, meaning a privately made postcard where postage had to be affixed was introduced in Austria in 1869 and by 1870, picture postcards were all the rage!
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Old 10-04-2008, 08:35 PM
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Pioneer Era, 1780-1898

The first postal card was suggested by Dr. Emanuel Herrmann, in 1869, and was accepted by the Hungarian government in the same year. The first regularly printed card appeared in 1870, a historical card, produced in connection with the Franco-German War. The first advertising card appeared in 1872 in Great Britain. The first German card appeared in 1874. Cards showing the Eiffel Tower in 1889 & 1890 gave impetus to the postcard heyday a decade later. A Heligoland card of 1889 is considered the first multi-colored card ever printed.
In this country, the earliest known exposition card appeared in 1873, showing the main building of the Inter-State Industrial Exposition in Chicago. This card as well as other early advertising cards, usually bearing vignette designs were not originally intended for souvenirs. Thus the first card printed with the intention for use as a souvenir were the cards placed on sale in 1893 at the Columbian Exposition in Chicago. During this period all privately printed cards required the regular two cent letter rate postage, the new government printed postals required only one cent.
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Old 10-07-2008, 04:49 PM
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Private Mailing Card Era.... 1898- 1901

Starting in 1898, American publishers were allowed to print and sell cards bearing the inscription,"private Mailing Card, Authorised by Act of Congress, May 19 1898.These private mailing cards were to be posted with one cent stamps ( the same rate a government postals). This was perhaps the most significant event to enhance the use of private postals. As with government postals and previous pioneer cards, writing was still reserved for the front (picture side) of the cards only.
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Old 10-09-2008, 02:03 PM
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Undivided Back Era 1901-1907


In 1901, the U.S. Government granted the use of the words "Post Card" to be printed on the undivided back of privately printed cards and allowed publishers to drop the authorization inscription previously required. As in earlier eras, writing was still limited to the front. However, during this time, other countries began to permit the use of a divided back. This enabled the front to be used exclusively for the design, while the back was divided so that the left side was for writing messages and the right side for the address. England was the first to permit the divided back in 1902, France followed in 1904, Germany in 1905 and finally the U.S. in 1907. These changes ushered in the "Golden Age" of postcards as millions were sold and used.



Divided Back Era 1907 - 1915
By this period, divided backs were almost universal, except in a few monopolistic governments. Previous to and during this period, a majority of U.S. postcards were printed in Europe, especially in Germany whose printing methods were regarded as the best in the world. However the trying years of this period, the rising import tariffs and the threats of war, caused a swift decline in the cards imported. Thus the political strains of the day brought about the end of the "Golden Age".
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Old 10-12-2008, 08:47 PM
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Early Modern Era (white border) 1916-1930
During this period, American technology advanced allowing us to produce quality cards, although we often produced inferior ones in order to compete in the saturated market place. Public appeal changed and greeting card publication declined. However the view card market remained strong. The cards of this era were usually printed with white borders around the picture, thus the term 'white border cards'


Linen Card Era 1930-1945
Changing technology now enabled publishers to print cards on a linen type paper stock with very bright and vivid colors. View and comic cards were the most often published. Sets and series were few and far between and the greeting card was almost exclusively replaced with the new French-fold cards. Among the best cards of this era are the political humor cards of World War II.



Photochrome Era 1939- present

The Union Oil Series began in 1939, launching the new era of photochrome cards. Photochromes are commonly called 'Modern Chromes', are still the most popular cards today. Since the earlier days of fine printing craftsmanship, these are the best reproductions to come along in years. Collectors are expressing interest in these cards. Also despite the increase in postal rates for postcards from one cent to the current twenty-three cents, postcard popularity continues to rise. Even the greeting post card is making a big return, though usually seen as reproductions of old cards, more and more new original art is being produced.
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Old 10-16-2008, 09:54 PM
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Postcard Types...
View cards

View cards have, since postcards began, been the mainstay of the collecting field. People have long collected and traded cards of their home towns and places they have visited. View cards offer historic reference to buildings, streets, and even towns which may no longer exist or that have changed significantly over time. Even views produced in the photochrome (chrome) era may no longer look the same. The earliest cards offer much in the social history of the times as we look at early forms of travel and the beginnings of telegraph, telephone and power lines. The messages written on the cards often give us insight as to the picture shown or the sentiments of the day.


Greeting cards


The greeting card is almost as basic as the view card in the earlier eras, though as the time graph has shown, it's popularity declined in later era's. Christmas, Easter, Birthdays and most other holidays and special occasions were well represented and are fairly common. However some greetings such as the "Labor Day" cards, are considered scarce. Today most collectors choose a topic within a specific holiday in order to limit their searches. For example some choose Christmas cards depicting Santa in green robes only. Early greeting cards are some of the most beautiful cards every printed. Publishers competing for sales, printed cards using intricate embossing techniques, high caliber art work, superior inks, expensive lithographic processes and even novelty additions such as glitter, ribbons, silk and feathers.
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