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Pets & Animals Whether you have dogs, cats, ferrets, birds or horses, post with others in this friendly pet forum. Lost a pet? We have a Rainbow Bridge forum too.

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  #31 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2003, 06:19 AM
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Well, that is the issue here with declawing, 3yo dd is the one I am most worried about. Being scratched and bitten, I think I will end up cutting the cost and not declawing, she is already all scratched from playing with the kitty.

Are they born with naturally sharp claws? This little kitten has razor sharp claws!! And he uses them to climb on us.

No have not gotten it to the vet yet, I am not so concerned with its sex, since once it is old enough to be spayed/neutered the sex will not matter anymore. Correct? This is a must and a no brainer!!! There are already about 10 stray cats in our park. They have to dig through the trash for food.

At what age do they start the vacs for kittens? How old must they be to be spayed/neutered?
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  #32 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2003, 06:30 AM
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Are they born with naturally sharp claws? This little kitten has razor sharp claws!! And he uses them to climb on us.
Yes! they all are born with sharp claws.....You should begin to trim the nails, so that the kitten gets use to it....and keep them trimmed. You can get cat trimmers at your local pet shop.

No have not gotten it to the vet yet, I am not so concerned with its sex, since once it is old enough to be spayed/neutered the sex will not matter anymore. Correct? This is a must and a no brainer!!! There are already about 10 stray cats in our park. They have to dig through the trash for food.

At what age do they start the vacs for kittens?
I would say that you should take it to the vet and have it checked out ASAP!
How old must they be to be spayed/neutered?
6 mos. is when all of mine were done. They use to wait 9 mos. for the males.....but, they are able to do it sooner now (If your vet is Good!) Some of the SPCA's would have already done it, but, they are finding there can be problems down the road if done to soon!!!!! The I would say "6 months!"

Good Luck!
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  #33 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2003, 07:07 AM
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You mentioned feline immune virus.__Would that be the incurable contagious virus that a vet told us on the 16th that our cat had?? She told us it is something outdoor cats get, and the only thing to be done for them--IF you want to keep them--is to medicate them for the rest of their lives. Our cat also was one who came to us via being left behind somehow, and was starving. I fed it, and, of course, it stayed. We had him for eight years, so became very attached to him. His behavior changed so that we knew something was wrong, and took hhim to the vet's where he stayed two nights. It was a very hard decision to have him put down, but, as the vet said, we could take him home, and KEEP him inside, and medicate him the rest of his life, saying he MIGHT last two years. It cost $394.50 for those two nights, any treatments, and cost of putting him to sleep. besides his disposal. We'd be broke paying for about two years' worth of medication, and vet's bills. It killed us to do it, but as the vet told us, he was SICK, and the most humane thing for him.
I missed him so much at first, but am getting used to it now, and am dismissing thoughts of another cat. I do not want litter boxes, so that takes care of it.
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Old 05-22-2003, 07:18 AM
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Here is the URL for North Fork Animal Hospital:
http://www.northforkanimalhospital.com/

They have lots of good, accurate information about various pets and their illnesses. They list treatment options etc.


Elizabeth - Grandmom to a baseball team and one lonely little cheerleader
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  #35 (permalink)  
Old 05-22-2003, 11:47 AM
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Last year my hubby brought home to me an abandoned kitten he found at his work. It was so tiny and way to young to eat. I went to Petco and got a bottle and kitten formula to feed it. I also took him to the vet to make sure he was ok. That was about 8 months ago and now he is king of the house.

Good luck with your kitty.

Here are some pics of him

Lisa
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  #36 (permalink)  
Old 05-23-2003, 04:14 AM
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Exclamation

Info. from North Fork Animal Hospital

Facts Your Cat Wants To Know About FELV and FIV... Feline Leukemia (FELV) and Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV)

FELV and FIV affect your cat in a similar way. Both viruses attack the immune system. Both can hide inside your cat for a long time. Both can kill. Fortunately, however, both viruses can be detected with a single blood test. In just minutes, your veterinarian can tell if your cat is infected. If free from FELV, a vaccine can help protect your pal from getting the disease. If free from FIV, your veterinarian can suggest health management and disease control measures you can take to avoid the risk of infection.

Spread of Disease
Typically, FELV is spread when the saliva of an infected cat comes in contact with another cat. This can occur from mutual licking and grooming or shared food and water bowls. The virus can also be spread through the urine or feces, that is, sharing litter boxes. Getting FIV is a little more difficult. As the virus lives in the blood of the infected cat, it is spraed when one cat bites or scratches another. Therefor, outdoor cats, who are more likely to fight with other cats, are at higher risk for this disease.

Signs To Watch For
While some infected cats show no signs of disease at all, most have one or more of the following symptoms:
-Fever
-Loss of appetite
-Weight Loss
-Poor coat condition
-Sores in or around mouth
-Swollen lymph nodes
-Diarrhea
-Dehydration

Cats At Risk
All cats can contract either disease, but studies have shown some cats are at more risk than others. These include: -Stray cats -Cats not vaccinated for FELV -Outdoor male cats -Cats entering a new, multi-cat home

How Likely Is My Cat To Get These Disease?
In the United States, a nationwide study of 28,000 cats revealed that more than 1 in 5 carried at least one of the viruses. Regular testing, and when possible, vaccination, are the best methods of ensuring the health of your cat and preventing the spread of the disease.

Can Humans Get FELV or FIV?
So far research has shown that FELV and FIV are only a concern for cats. At this time no other species is affected by the viruses.

Is It Necessary To Test Prior To Vaccination?
Yes. University experts in feline medicine a well as vaccine manufacturers recommend testing prior to vaccinating for FELV. Vaccinating a cat that already has FELV will not help it. Knowing your cat is infected will also allow you to provide better care for your cat and help prevent the spread of the disease to other cats.
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Old 05-23-2003, 04:33 AM
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Trimming nails....

Hi Michele. I trim my cats nails all the time. It's easy but make sure you do it when they are resting or relaxed. My cat used to fight me when I would do it but I've become quick at it and before you know it, it's done. It's a much better way of keeping the cat from clawing everything in sight and a much better alternative than declawing. I use dog toe nail clippers you can get at petsmart or anywhere. Or I think they have special ones just for cats, not sure. But good luck.

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  #38 (permalink)  
Old 05-23-2003, 04:59 AM
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Can I get a regular sized clippers? This kitten is small, I am worried that a dog sized one will clip the kittens whole paw off! I have to go look at the clippers to get a better idea.
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Old 05-23-2003, 06:41 AM
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They indeed do make cat claw scissors or clippers. Actually the dog nail clippers have been know to"splinter" cat nails.
In most cats you can see the red blood vessel in the nail. You need to cut slightly in front of this. With dog clippers many people hold them backwards and end up cutting too far back. If you hold your cats paw and gently push down on the tops of the toes the claw will extend allowing you to have access to it.
It does help to keep them trimmed. They aren't as likely to snag you or other materials.
If you are using dog clippers make sure the rounded part is on bottom or so the moving blade in on top so that you can see it.
If you do accidently clip too far and it bleeds you can make a quick paste from corn startch and dab it on to help stop it. Or if you are in the pet store silver nitrate sticks work well. Quick Stop being one brand name. One warning though the silver nitrate may sting a little. And if you do nip too far the cat maynot be as thrilled about getting it's nails done the next time. Take you time and have patience. Good Luck!
Hope this helps.
Robin in NC
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Old 05-23-2003, 07:54 AM
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Are you aware that you can get little "claw covers" for kittens and cats? They are called "SoftPaws" or "SoftClaws." If you start your kitty with them when young, it will get used to them and not have any problem with them. You put them on with the same kind of CA glue (superglue) that you use for your own nails.

The baby kitties we rescued adapted really well to them. You can usually get them through your vet. I haven't seen them at the local pet supply stores, but they are available on the internet:

http://www.softpaws.com/default.htm
http://www.softclaws.com/default.asp

They do fall off after several days and have to be re-glued. Then they fall off and get lost, you have to get more. But they are more humane than declawing.

Trimming is another easy option, and if you start with trimming when the kitty is very young, it will get used to it.

SoftPaws weren't available when we had our three older cats declawed, but when our aging kitties die and we get kittens again, I suspect we will opt for them. (We have a water bed and declawed or totally blunted kitty claws is very important!)

That said, if people opt for declawing, it's best to do it when they are very small - it is less painful for them then, and they adapt to it better.

Cheerio!

Elizabeth - Grandmom to a baseball team and one lonely little cheerleader
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