What do we need for new pup?

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  • We are picking up our new beagle puppy this weekend. What should we have by then. Leash, food, water and food dish, newspaper (pup will be 8 weeks old). Anything else? I haven't owned a dog since I was a teen and don't want to forget anything!

    Thanks!
  • Congratulations on your new pup. We are pretty much leaning to a small lab (black) but haven't chosen one yet. I'll be interested to follow your posting because I'm gonna need to know this stuff too.

    Blessings to you and your new family member!
  • Hi and Congrats on the new member of the family! We've had a yellow lab-golden mix since he was 6 weeks old-he's now 5 months. There are two things that have been MOST valuable to us... the book, "Culture Clash" by Jean Donaldson, and joining the SPT (Start Puppy Training) list at Yahoo Groups. Living with a puppy is not always easy but the people at SPT are always there with help and suggestions and sometimes just support for those nights when the pup is up every hour on the hour. My best moment came when our puppy was about 3 months old and we were out at a farmer's market. One lady remarked that she had never seen such a young puppy so well behaved. A little while later a man stopped to ask us who our trainers were? I can't recommend the list enough! Good Luck!

    Jo
  • puppy things needed
    we just picked up an akc boxer at 5 weeks old all sharp teeth in he is now 6 weeks old. he nips so thats going to tell you he is going to chew. chewing toys lots a colorful rope 2 pig ears smoked we always feed leftovers from after we eat dinner. plain small biscuit bones in a bag large puppy chow. dog food and water bowl heavy so he cannot dump them. love ya carriejude and last but not least a companion
  • Beagle-YAY!
    Hi,
    I LOVE Beagles!
    I so recommend a kennel! Our Beagle, Icky, loved his kennel!
    If you are not with your dog you can't teach him right and wrong.
    If he has his nice safe kennel, he can be in there with what he is ALLOWED to chew on, and he won't get into trouble. That way he doesn't eat something can make him sick, or learn to chew shoes!
    Dogs are kennel animals, they feel safe in a kennel, they can see what is coming at them, and they know it can't sneak up on them.
    It's like their own little bedroom!
    Enjoy him/her! I miss ours!

  • puppy
    i do a large crate when whelping my female bishon frisee if she is in the mood most of the time not so i bring out my black king size quilt to finish it they stay there until needed to be weened then the pups go into the crate with puppy chow and water and milk and rug or papers on floor, as for lab i had a black akc for 1 year the dog pound man kept coming to my home after i put him on his tie out to go potty in the morning after the fourth time i told him tell all the complaining neighbors we are moving. he ran so fast my son hardly could catch up with himto bring him home then he ran with a dog pack.
  • Chew toys, chew toys, chew bones, chewies, and more chew toys. We got out now 5 m.o. border collie when she was 8 weeks old. I can not stress, enough to get chew toys. Keep your shoes away from puppy. We lost alot of little sandals due to chewing. Also, lots of patients, and quick easy slip on shoes beside the door, they can not hold it for long.
  • Hi there... *s*

    First, I suggest you get a crate, and a book ...how to crate train my dog.....Beagles are cute, but they are not the easiest to housebreak.....so please do the crate train thing.

    And before y'all complain, I know from whence I speak...over 25 years of training all breeds from puppy to adult....

    Make an appointment with a vet. Take your pup to the vet the day you pick him up for a check up....and follow his vaccination advice....

    It's never too early to train your pup...You can teach him to sit!
    Go to:

    www.pedigree.com
    sign up for their newsletter, puppy scoops....lots of good sound advise there..
    Here's an excerpt...

    Crate training your puppy

    Most puppies donít like to soil the place where they eat and sleep so your pup's crate can be a very effective way of house-training your puppy. An added bonus is that most puppies feel very comfortable in their crate as it provides a safe den for them. The crate should be in a high traffic area of your home so your puppy doesn't feel isolated. Never send your puppy to his crate as a punishment. And, because most puppies canít control their bladders for extended periods, they should only be in the crate for short periods of time and should be given an opportunity to relieve their bladders every hour. With proper crate training you establish a routine with your puppy, and he is more likely to relieve his bladder in the correct spot in your presence. Get more information on crate training your puppy.

    Crate training your puppy



    What is crate training?

    Crate training does not mean confining your puppy so he doesn't get into mischief. This isn't the correct use of the crate. Because most puppies don't like to soil the place where they eat and sleep, when given adequate opportunities to do so somewhere else, the crate is a very effective way of house-training your puppy. An added bonus is that most puppies feel very comfortable in a crate as it provides a safe den for them.

    How to crate train your puppy

    If you purchased a large crate so that your puppy can use it when he is full-grown, partition it. This will make it more den-like and comfortable for your puppy. He will also be less likely to soil the smaller space as long as he's not left in the crate for extended periods. Make the crate comfortable by lining it with your puppy's favorite blanket.

    Step 1:

    Put a few treats in the crate and show your puppy how to get in. Once he is in, praise him a lot and reward him with a treat. Don't close the door of the crate. At this point you just want to introduce your puppy to the crate, and show him how to get in and out.

    Step 2:

    Choose a cue word that will be used consistently, such as "crate." Using the word you have chosen, lead your puppy to his crate with a treat. Again, once in, reward him with a lot of praise and a treat. Repeat this several times until your puppy knows what you want him to do when he hears the cue word.

    Step 3:

    When your puppy is familiar with the cue word repeat the above step but this time, once your puppy is in the crate, shut the door. The door should only be shut for a very short period of time. Immediately upon taking your puppy out of his crate bring him outside and give him an opportunity to relieve himself.

    Step 4:

    As your puppy gets used to resting in the crate you can give him the cue word at different times and for longer intervals. You should be at home when your puppy is crated and he should not be crated for longer than 45 minutes to an hour.

    Successful crate training

    The crate should be in a high traffic area of your home. If your puppy feels isolated he won't enjoy the crate. As with any training the more enjoyable it is for your puppy, the more successful it will be. In order for crate training to be successful a puppy should never be sent to the crate as a punishment. And, because most puppies can't control their bladders for extended periods, they should only be in the crate for short periods of time. Immediately upon taking your puppy out of his crate bring him outside and give him an opportunity to relieve himself. Puppies should be given an opportunity to relieve their bladders every hour. If your puppy has soiled his crate, it's likely he was left in the crate too long. With proper crate training you establish a routine with your puppy, and he is more likely to relieve his bladder in the correct spot in your presence.


    DO NOT give puppy run of the house. That is earned.

    Have food bowls and water bowls, chew toys, crate, leash, collar.

    Finally do sign up for puppy training classes asap.
    It's good for them, socialization is important! And never never hit your dog. There are many books on training..be sure to get one that teaches both positive and negative reinforcement....
    The world is that way, positive and negative... so should the training be..... for animal and human...*chuckle*

    Good luck with your puppy..

    Jeannie
  • Hi, congratulations on your puppy. Our "puppy" will be 2yrs in October. He is a golden retriever- rottwieler- black lab mix named Bear. We decided to pick him up spur of the moment and were not able to do things really organized, as I was just about 2 months from delivering our baby. We were not prepared for the amazing amount of time he required. He got it, but I was bone tired getting up at all hours of the night and walking him all the time, plus caring for 3 kids under 4 yrs. In retrospect I would do things a lot different.
    When you are able I strongly encourage you to get your dog into a puppy training course or dog obedience classes. They are wonderful. I have seen first hand how well these courses work, especially when you have young children around.
    I would do the crate training too, newspaper is to confusing. We started with that at night and he would go on papers left on the floor. We then started taking him out every hour at night too and/ or 20 minutes after food and water. It didn't take long for him to learn to go to the door when he wanted to go out.
    When he is old enough get him fixed. With our dog it helped settle him down a little. Make sure he gets all his shots as soon as posible.
    Definitely get some bone or chew toys, liitle kongs work great, don't use plastic or those string things. My dog had serious problems choking on the strings or getting them caught intestinally. Besides, that might help with chewing or scratching furniture and help with teething.
    I would recommend a kennel. We waited a couple of months and had lots of problems with clothes/ toys/ and furniture being chewed, even when he was locked in a room. Now we have a kennel and he loves it. We leave the door open so he can go in and out when he pleases. When he is in the house he sleeps in there and then will stay there when we leave now.
    For walks I would get one of those collar/ leash attachments that fit over their muzzle. With a smaller dog it wouldn't be so bad, but my hulk of an animal is kind of intimidating. While I know he would never harm anyone especially a child no one else does. It's just safer. Also make sure you have a good strong anchor if you tie him up outside. Bear is too strong and will on ocassion get loose. He doesn't go very far, usually were the kids are. The neighborhood kids know him and will bring him back (it seems to be a problem with other neighbor dogs too, problem is they are all black labs and everyone keeps bringing them to our house...LOL)
    I LOVE my dog, but it was totally trial and error for us. If I can help someone else not make the same mistakes I will be happy. Oh yeah, keep him in a different room when you eat right from the beginning, it will keep you from giving him scraps every night, and it will help him to not beg or take food out of the kids hands. I just buy cans of wet food to supplement a couple times a week. He loves it and it's more healthy for him. Get heavy dishes. Otherwise it's just a mess. I hope this helps you. Good luck!

  • Suggestion for new puppy
    One thing that we found beneficial when we got our "puppy" that is now 10 years old and still a big puppy was an uncle ben's alarm clock. The ticking made the pup think that it was the mother's heartbeat and it would make the pup sleep a little better through the night. Don't know if it would work on a beagle seeing that ours is part pointer and part ****er spaniel. It's worth a try.