Visit FamilyCorner.com for tons of seasonal ideas!
quick link - go to our home page quick link - kid's crafts, family fun, printables, etc quick link - sign up for our free newsletter quick link - holiday crafts, recipes and ideas quick link - gardening, organizing, saving money, decorating and more quick link - our FunBook is filled with lots of quick ideas, tips and crafts quick link - join our bustling community of friendly members


Go Back   FamilyCorner.com Forums >

Pets & Animals Whether you have dogs, cats, ferrets, birds or horses, post with others in this friendly pet forum. Lost a pet? We have a Rainbow Bridge forum too.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 11 votes, 5.00 average.
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 06-11-2002, 05:13 AM
patjohant's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 52
Progressive Hip Dysplasia

I just found out last night my puppy (6 months old) has Progressive Hip Dysplasia. The vet put him on Rimadol (sp) for 10 days. Then he is going to do X-rays.
Does anyone have any info for me?
__________________
Patjohant
Loving wife of Dave and Step-in-mom to Nicole and now her baby Shaniah!!
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2002, 02:33 PM
Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Posts: 5
Hip Dysplasia

I'm soo sorry to hear about your puppy. Over five years ago, I had gotten a puppy from a pet shop and after a couple weeks, she started to favor one of her back legs. I took her for X-rays and found out she had hip dysplasia. The vet said the only thing to do for her was a hip replacement. I did not even know it was possible to do that on an animal. Well, I took it into deep consideration. It would be a very expensive procedure, would be a long recovery, and it could even show up in the other hip. This was something common in her breed. She was a toy breed (can't remember exactly what it was, she looked like a Doberman, but was only about three or four pounds). Since she was so tiny, and not even three months old, I decided that it was not worth putting her through.

Since I had had her for not even a month, I went back to the pet shop (they had a three month health guarantee) I returned her for another puppy. I'm sure that they just had her put to sleep. I know it sounds cruel and heartless, but believe me, I LOVE animals, especially dogs. If there was a good chance that she would have made a full recovery and lived a long healthy life, I would have gone for it. But she was so young and there was no guarantee that she would recover perfectly.

I'm sorry that your puppy is going through this. I know that it's a painful disease, and even worse on puppies because all they want to do is run around and have fun.

Hopefully you can come to a decision that will work out good for all involved.
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2002, 04:20 PM
kimmyo's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Leesburg, Alabama
Posts: 913
Veterinary medicine has come a long way in the past few years. There are some excellent prescription drugs on the market today. Rimadyl is one of them, although it can be pricey. Here is a link to Phizer (manufacturer) to give you some info on this drug:

http://www.rimadyl.com/images/about/...nine_about.gif

You didn't mention what breed your puppy is. I know that Labrador are well known for having Hip Dysplasia. I hope that you will trust your vet and continue to care for your new family member.
__________________
KimmyO
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 06-12-2002, 04:58 PM
Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Missouri
Posts: 1
Hip Dysplasia

Hi Pat,

Sorry, this will probably be too late to help you very much, But it might help someone else with the same problem. I have worked for vets for the past thirteen years and I also have a dog with hip dysplasia.

He was diagnosed with it at about 6 months and he is now fourteen years old. He is a medium breed dog which helps. The larger breeds suffer more scince they carry more weight. But I was told when he was diagnosed to wait and see how it affected him and that turned out to be good advise.

For about the first ten years of his life he did just fine. I gave him the occasional half of a coated aspirin just when he had a semi-hard time. Once a day just when it was really cold or he overdid his exercise. When he hit about eleven though he also started have arthritis in his front paws. That is when one of my vets started him on a stronger drug called Etogesic. He has good days and bad days. Some days he is bouncy and others although he is mobil he limps a little bit.

The main advise is keep the pet lean. Any extra body weight contributes to the problem. Do not over exert the pet. Long walks are not a good idea, neither is running around in the yard for long periods a good idea. With experience your pet will let you know what is too much. He'll spend the next day hobbling around.

Don't prescribe any medications yourself. Even aspirin in the wrong dose can cause bleeding ulcers and stomach upset. Always ask your vet. Use the mildest medications first to try and find what is the least amount of medication you can use to get the results you need. These needs will probably change as your pet gets older. Hopefully you can start with mild medicines like aspirin and save the stronger drugs for when your pet is older and the situation gets worse. All of these medications can have side affects used long term so use them as sparingly as possible without sacrificing your pets comfort.

There are varying grades of dysplasia. If you have a pup as young as 6 months old and they are already prescribing Rimadyl there are two possibilities. He has severe dysplasia that lesser drugs won't help or maybe they haven't even tried to use the lesser drugs which may cause problems later in life if these strong drugs are started so soon.

Hip dysplasia is an ongoing problem. Some dogs are relatively lucky and manage with some extra care to live relatively pain free with only mild medicinal intervention, at least until they are older.
Others just keep getting rapidly worse and the only choice really is surgery or euthanasia if they are unable to get around by themselves.

And please just a reminder again. Never give medications without a vets advise. Tylenol which is a great human medication can be toxic for dogs scince they can't metabolize it the way we do. It builds up in their liver and can cause damage or even death. With cats it is even more lethal. Never use Tylenol unless a vet prescribes it for a very limited time in a specific dosage. Never use any drugs with cats unless prescribed by a vet. Most drugs can be lethal to them.

Good Luck!
__________________
Erin
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2002, 06:57 AM
patjohant's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: USA
Posts: 52
PHD

My pup is a lab/german shepherd/?? mix. We got him Dec. 22 from a shelter. She passed him off as 9 weeks old our vet said he wasn't more than 5 weeks.
I know from past experience with our last dog our vet prescribed 2 buffered aspirin a day, he was a full ger shep and had arthritis. One day I got a call to come right home he was bleeding profusely from the snout. He had to stay at the vets for 2 days and my DH took 2 days off work to monitor him since he was still bleeding. At the time I thought that was the hardest thing I would ever go through with him. We took him off the aspirin regimen his arthritis got worse, he was never comfortable - he would circle and cry and lay down with a thud. We finally made the decision to put him down. I was a wreck for months. I never thought a pet could affect me that way. We don't have children so he and the cat took their place. I'm off the subject, but I don't know anything else yet I will post again on July 1st after our next vet visit.
Thank you for all your kind words, they are greatly appreciated
I have attached a pic of my dearly departed and beloved GS and a pic of our new pup taken 4 months ago, new pics are at store right now being developed.
Attached Images
 
__________________
Patjohant
Loving wife of Dave and Step-in-mom to Nicole and now her baby Shaniah!!
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 06-13-2002, 05:27 PM
Jeannie's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: In the piney woods of Texas
Posts: 1,185
Hi Pat...sorry to hear about your pup....

I have 3 sites I'd like for you to visit.....

This is Pfizer's site...the manufacturer of the medication your dog has been given by your Vet...

http://dog-arthritis.rimadyl.com/


This one is the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals..also known as OFA.....I've xrayed all my breeding stock and all are certified....

This is a great site to browse....

http://www.offa.org/hdgrade.html

And another about dysplasia....

http://www.workingdogs.com/vchipdysplasia.htm


Dysplasia can be very mild to severely crippling....some dog owners will opt for a hip replacement operation. I hope this is a very mild case.. If it isn't, you and your family have some tough decisions to make. Hopefully all will be mild....will pray for puppy.

Jeannie
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 06-15-2002, 01:50 PM
otheila's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Admirer
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Nova Scotia
Posts: 178
Hip Health

It is a supplement that is sprinkled over there food. It is an awesome product, but it is very expensive. My best friend has a 'pack' of Mastiffs and swears by the the stuff. We had used it on our old shepard he went from having to be carried outside to going outside on his own with no problems.
Keep the dog lean with plenty of short walks a day no more then 10 minutes long or so.
There is also Solid Gold dog food which is formulated for hip problems again expensive but worth it.

You never mentioned what type of dog he is. If it one of the giant breeds it could possibly be a calcium build up due to fast growth.
hope your puppy is ok
__________________
Do or do not. There is no try
- Yoda Jedi Master
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 06-23-2002, 03:28 PM
Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2002
Posts: 3
Just watch his weight. Our labrador (who was 14 at the time of his death) had severe dysplasia in one of his hips. The ball was almost completely out of the socket. We were told the surgery to correct it would cost almost $2000 per hip. That was way too much for a dog. So we chose to control it with weight watching and mild exercise. He did fine as long as he didn't run too much. Then if he was really sore, we gave him 4 buffered aspirin with a milk bone.
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 07-04-2002, 11:30 AM
kimmyo's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Leesburg, Alabama
Posts: 913
The following article was sent to me in a newsletter from my Vet. I thought I would share this information with you but as always I reccomend you verify any information you recieve over the internet with your own vet.

Canine Hip Dysplasia (CHD) is a developmental disorder of the hip that begins with joint laxity and progresses to arthritis over a period of several months to years. It is one of the most common skeletal diseases seen by veterinarians. The condition is very common in large breed dogs, but can be seen in any breed.

Multiple genes are involved in the inheritance of hip dysplasia, and many other factors influence its development, including body type, size, growth rate, and nutrition. Overfeeding and dietary supplementation for maximal growth has been shown to increase the incidence of hip dysplasia in young, growing and large breed dogs. Conversely the development of hip dysplasia can be delayed, and its severity diminished when the growth rate of pups is restricted.

Diagnosis
The diagnosis of hip dysplasia is based on history, physical examination, and radiographic evaluation. A typical history may include any or all of the following:

difficulty or stiffness upon rising
rising using front legs only and dragging rear
"bunny hopping" gait
short stride in rear legs
reluctance to exercise or climb stairs
rear limb lameness
soreness in hips
waddling rear limb gait
The clinical signs commonly begin between five to eight months of age or after skeletal maturity. Some dogs don't have noticeable problems until eight to ten years of age or older. The onset of clinical signs may appear sudden or gradual. This variability is due to the individual severity of the disease as well as pain tolerance of the pet.

Most dogs with CHD are most painful when the hips are extended by pulling the rear legs back behind the body. Palpation of the hips usually reveals joint laxity, although anesthesia may be required to detect it in some cases.

Radiographs are necessary to confirm the diagnosis and evaluate the severity of CHD. In young dogs or in very mild cases, joint laxity may be the only detectable abnormality. Later in the disease arthritic changes are seen. The standard radiographic position is with the dog lying on its back with both rear legs pulled straight back and parallel to each other. Most dogs with CHD are too painful to tolerate this position awake, so sedation or anesthesia is usually necessary. Proper radiographic positioning is very important to accurately evaluate the hips and to determine the best treatment.

Treatment
Medical and/or surgical treatment may be recommended for CHD, depending on the individual circumstances. Medical management usually consists of exercise restriction, body weight management, and symptomatic pain management with analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs. A non-weight bearing activity like swimming is the preferred type of exercise since it places minimal stress on the joints.

Several surgical options are now available for treating the various stages of hip dysplasia. They include the triple pelvic osteotomy, femoral head and neck excision, and total hip replacement.
__________________
KimmyO
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 07-09-2002, 12:15 PM
BLTN_Mom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Groupie
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Tulsa, OK USA; somewhere in Mundania
Posts: 358
Mrsbosse - the toy breed that looks like a Doberman is what is called a 'mini pin' miniature pinser.
There are breeds that the problem with CHD is so bad that there is specialized breeding and certificate programs to breed the genetic predisposition for it out of the dogs...
__________________
Cheryl, A True Packrat with DH Pooky and DS Boo
F.R.O.G. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fund Mammograms for FREE!
"I am reading a great book about anti-gravity. I just can't put it down. " unknown

Reply With Quote
 
Reply



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 01:26 PM.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

POPULAR AREAS OF FAMILYCORNER.COM

Our Family FunBook is packed full of ideas from parents just like you!

Our members say that they have never found a friendlier message board community than ours!

Our kid's craft section is filled with easy ideas for creative little minds.

We have tons of free printable coloring pages to keep your little ones happy.

We offer a wide variety of free newsletters delivered right to your inbox.

Our Household Hints & Tips have a wealth of information on cleaning, organizing, and more!
Go to the funbook Go to forums Go to kid's crafts Go to printables Go to newsletters Go to Hints & Tips

Home || Newsletters || Advertising || Terms of Use || Privacy || Services || Submissions || Contact Us || Media Opportunities || Link To Us || Shop || Feedback || Staff || e-Cards || Reminder Service



FamilyCorner.com® is sponsored in part by...




Visit our friends --> MomsMenu | Main Street Mom | She Knows | Baby University | Personal Fitness Zone | iChef.com

Copyright Notice | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use/Disclaimer