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  #21 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2004, 02:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jeannie
Amanda.

I am so sorry to hear about the epilepsy... Has the vet
prescribed ant-convulsives for her? She is a lovely dog and
you've done very well with her. I wish everyone was as
responsible as you.... give Angel a kiss from Auntie Jean...*s*
Thanks Jeannie Yes we have medication on hand, but we get through the seizures ok, keep things nice and calm and they only last a few minutes. So far only three, and none in the past two months
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  #22 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2004, 03:27 PM
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Just one comment - a muzzle won't keep a dog from barking. It will keep the dog from biting.

Barking usually is a behavioral issue that can be dealt with through training. You might contact your local Petsmart or Petco and see if they have any dog training classes. There is also obedience training that helps. Many dogs, especially those with working breed genes in them, *need* to work - to do something. If you don't give them tasks to do, they will make up their own tasks. An example is the border collie that lived down the road from us in SC. The owners didn't give the dog anything to do, so it would "herd" the cars coming down the road, and "herd" the children at the school bus stop (that was sooooo funny to watch). It tried to herd my cat, but Pirate wasn't very "docile" and "herdable" ...

I hope you get some help with your dogs. It sounds as if they need a purpose in life other than barking at things and people.

Good luck!

Cheerio!
Elizabeth
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  #23 (permalink)  
Old 08-16-2004, 07:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by Jeannie


mowire.. take this very seriously. I do not trust ANY dog with a baby ....EVER.

DO NOT leave the dog with the baby, even for a second.

Babies sound like prey.... that puts the dog in hunt mode, and that's why dogs bite babies...or kill them.

it's a bad thing if they are treating the baby as prey.

I suggest you don't do babysitting while your dogs have access....
I have had the sad experience to respond to a call as a paramedic where a family dog killed a baby... It was instinct, and a horriffic scene. It is something I still have nightmares about 20 years later.. I can't imagine what the family lives with.

The mom reportedly left the baby napping while she went to the laundry room to start a wash.. Aparantly the baby must have began crying, and ecause the mom didn't hear the child right away the dog responded to the sound.. By the time the mom did hear the cries, it was too late, the dog already had the baby, and unfortunately, the injuries were to prove fatal.


We love them like they are our children.. but they are animals... and they will act instinctively like animals.. not like fuzzy four-legged people.
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  #24 (permalink)  
Old 08-17-2004, 04:40 AM
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Oh Val

That is so sad.

Anna
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  #25 (permalink)  
Old 08-18-2004, 02:19 AM
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THAT IS SOOOOO SAD!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I cant even imagine!!!!!thanks ladies for helping me out!!!!!!!!!!!
but dont you think it could get better????? at least a little??!!!
thanks for all your help...i kind of went off the subject a little so thanks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
a friend in NJ
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  #26 (permalink)  
Old 08-18-2004, 02:56 AM
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While I agree that one must be very, *very* cautious with dogs and babies, I think we all have to recognize that there are many more instances of dogs guarding and protecting babies than dogs attacking babies. Part has to do with the dog accepting the baby, part has to do with the breed of dog, part has to do with the individual personality of the dog in question. When my DKs were babies, our Newfie would have killed anyone who tried to harm them. If they cried, he (yes, a DOG, not a bitch) would lick them, then come get me if they kept crying. They teethed on his feet and ears, and learned to walk hanging onto him. Even when they pulled his hair and bit his ears, he never snapped or even growled. He just got up and walked away. Of course, I would intervene and they learned to not bite, but the point is that I hac hard evidence that he was ok with the kids.

Had he **ever** growled, whimpered, much less snapped, he would have been banished to the outdoor run - immediately. If there had ever been even the hint of a nip, he would have been put down. Period.

We very carefully assessed his behavior when we brought the first baby home - and he was totally fascinated and loving. So were the cats. None of our pets ever acted aggressively toward any of the children. Nemo decided DS was his baby, and he was so protective and careful with him it was just wonderful. When DS started walking, Nemo would walk beside him very carefully and many times kept DS from falling. All this made up for the fact that Nemo ate the arm off the sofa while teething...

So, since your doxies have behaved aggressively, they are not to be trusted near the baby - and should not be allowed in the same room with the baby, especially when you are not there. And, no, I do not think it will get better. Doxies are genetically aggressive dogs - they are hunters and were initially bred to go into holes in the ground and kill rats and other rodents. A doxie frequently is suspicious of new people, and often is a "one person dog." This is part of their genetic makeup. So I would not trust your doxies anywhere near the baby - set up gates to keep the dogs out of the room with the baby. Even better, keep the dogs in an entirely different part of the house.

So, baseline, breed, personality, and training/acceptance are all involved, but until a canine has been shown consistently to be "safe" with a baby, it should not be permitted near a baby - certainly not even in the same room with a baby or without supervision.

Cheerio!
Elizabeth
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  #27 (permalink)  
Old 08-18-2004, 04:16 PM
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Doxies were bred to hunt badger.. go into badger holes... badgers have very long powerful claws....and teeth....they were also used to hunt fox and wild boar. They are Standoffish by nature, Dachshunds need extensive exposure to people and to unusual sights and sounds. Otherwise their natural caution can become suspiciousness, which could lead to biting.

Here is a quote from
http://www.oamweb.com/educational/da...hunds.html#cld

How are they with children?


Dachshunds can be very good with children, provided they are socialized properly when they are puppies. I often let mine play with the children in the neighborhood, including babies, when I first got her (I still do), and I believe, at least in part, this made her very good and tolerant of children of all ages. Still, no matter how good any animal is with children, you should never leave them unsupervised
Anyone who meets a Dachshund has no doubt about who's dog it is. They are often one-person dogs, meaning they bond very closely with their master. A Dachshund's master is never alone in the house - they have a long, low shadow following them everywhere around the house. This is not to suggest that Dachshunds dislike other humans - quite the contrary. But they definitely know which human is theirs

You were lucky in that your dog was a baby sitter... however, no matter the breed, no matter the training, no matter the temperament, we don't know what trigger will turn the best behaved, loving dog into a hunter/aggressor. Therefore, after over 40 years of being in dogs, I still do not trust the best of them alone with a infant. A dog when left alone, reverts to being a dog. Even my dog, whom took more punishment than he should from stranger's children, I would not trust with an infant.
The prey drive, the instinct, the sound of an infant, sounds like prey. We have tried to duplicate the sound and we can not do it.

More:

http://www.yourpurebredpuppy.com/rev...achshunds.html

If you have small children, I do not recommend a Dachshund. First, children cannot help being clumsy, and that a child meant well is little solace to a Dachshund puppy who has been accidentally stepped on, sat on, rolled on, squeezed, or dropped onto the patio. The Dachshund's long back is especially fragile and prone to damage when he is picked up incorrectly or dropped. Second, even Dachshund adults may feel overwhelmed by the loud voices and quick movements that children can't help making -- and stress and shyness may be the result. Finally, some Dachshunds simply do not tolerate any nonsense from children and will bite if pushed too far.


There are exceptions to every rule. But, I would rather err on the side of caution, that to have a tragedy.
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  #28 (permalink)  
Old 08-19-2004, 04:54 AM
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Doxies?

O.k. I've tried reading back through the post but can't see who originally said they have a doxie. In the last posts, there is reference to Doxies, and the Dachshunds. I've never heard of Doxies, is this another name for Dachshunds? I have a dachshund/beagle mix... absolutely a precious little girl, by far my favorite.

Anna
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  #29 (permalink)  
Old 08-19-2004, 05:08 AM
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OOPS! Brain fog hit! Yup, I meant badgers (badgers are much bigger, meaner and more aggressive than rodents, and are *huge* compared to the size of a doxie).

Jeannie is probably right, but I'm really influence by my experiences with Newfoundlands who are usually placid and nurturing. So are St. Bernards (Nana in Peter Pan). Collies and Border Collies can be, too, but they tend to see children as something to herd.

I've seen dog attacks from the ER perspective, and I know just how bad they can be! The ones I've seen (and read about in the medical / nursing literature), however, were usually from a "bred-to-be-aggressive" breed, and were dogs that were not (well) trained or (properly) socialized. The injuries I've seen from "socialized" dogs were more in the "snap" category - the dog warning the child away with a snap like it would a puppy.

But I'm not going to dispute that no dog should be left alone with a baby or young child.

Cheerio!
Elizabeth
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Old 08-19-2004, 05:54 AM
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OSI - "doxie" is shorthand for Dachshund

Cheerio!
Elizabeth
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