Visit FamilyCorner.com for tons of seasonal ideas!
quick link - go to our home page quick link - kid's crafts, family fun, printables, etc quick link - sign up for our free newsletter quick link - holiday crafts, recipes and ideas quick link - gardening, organizing, saving money, decorating and more quick link - our FunBook is filled with lots of quick ideas, tips and crafts quick link - join our bustling community of friendly members


Go Back   FamilyCorner.com Forums >

Idle Chit Chat! Just want to chat with your FC friends? Come on in and talk it up!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 08-05-2005, 09:11 AM
AnnaInOhio's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Ohio
Posts: 16,238
Buying A Mobile Home In The Country

We are selling 2 homes and considering buying a mobile home and land in the country. Probably small amount of land 1-2 acres maximum. We are city folks, born and raised. For those of you who live in a mobile home what things should we be considering? Electric heat versus gas versus propane? Drinking and Sewer water, fencing and critter control.

Any advice would be helpful... it's scary taking this big leap. Oh btw, we are buying a brand new mobile home, not sure yet if single or double wide. Some things our friends have told us is make sure it's on a cement block or you can't get homeowners insurance? also that it has to be tied down.

And what do you do during tornado season? Do you have a special place to go?

Anna
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2005, 09:16 AM
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Admirer
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: southern Missouri
Posts: 187
Hi. Since we have done all this in the past two years for our daughter and her family (and they are city folks, too), perhaps our experiences will be of some assistance.

Available funds to relocate them down to the family farm were limited so we set a budget of absolute maximum of $50,000. We looked and found an incredible large double wide that only needed some minor repairs for $35,000 (repo) and then set about getting as much as possible included in the package price for that money. The unit has four bedrooms, front room, dining room, huge kitchen and family room, laundry room, office and three bathrooms w/central air. It is all electric.

Some of the types of things that needed fixed or replaced were: some carpeting; all of the screen doors; back door (total replacement); and some wallboard where someone had put a huge gaping hole.

We installed a concrete pad ourselves and the company was responsible for moving the two halves, and tieing down. Husband and brother in law then further anchored by installing a block foundation because we live in tornado alley. Also a year after they moved in, we were able to pour a sidewalk for them and also add a wrap around deck. There is no way anyone could tell now this unit was a moved-in trailer! We spent the entire $50,000 but when the appraiser came around, he valued the entire property in excess of $85,000.

Now, to your specific questions:
1. We use propane in our brick home, and have to do a pre-buy of about 400 gallons per winter season. Most rural folks use propane companys that offer a pre-buy, which means that when the current pre-buy price is announced in late spring, you have until a specified date ~ our is July 31st ~ to pay for the pre-buy in increments. We purchased 400 to 500 gallons each pre-buy. Five years ago, we were paying $.89.9 per gallon, and this season, we are paying $1.39.9. Pretty major expense but then it's a given each year and once paid, you can forget about it.

My daughter's all-electric is costing her about $300 a month in the severely cold and severely hot months, but falls quickly to about $125 a month in the more moderate months. That is without a doubt her largest expense and since we are part of a rural cooperative electric company, they don't have a level bill plan.

2. Taxs: Her assessed valuation (because her home is on a concrete block foundation and therefore a permanent fixture to the land) is now treated by the county as real estate. It can't be moved, therefore it is not considered a mobil home any longer. It's permanent real estate. Taxes for her run about $230 a year.

3. Torandoes: We do live in tornado alley and it is a part of life down here. They take no chances and have a root cellar they have turned into a storm cellar within yards of the back door off the deck. The cellar was originally built by my husband's long deceased father, and it is as sound today as when he built it. Not sure if I have the terminology correct for these but shelter in the root cellar is based on whether it is a warning or a watch. If the storm is imminent and is coming this way, they head for the cellar; if the storm means conditions are right for a possible storm, they prep the middle bathroom on the interior walls of the house with extra mattresses, blankets, etc. The cellar is permanently outfitted with benches, lanterns, etc., and even dog kennels.

4. Take extra care and funding to insure your pipes under the trailer are well wrapped and insulated. We triple insulated all her pipes and only once has she had a problem. Easy enough to take care of because there is a concrete pad down there ~ my husband just reclined on his creeper and away he went.

I hope your move to the country is successful and brings you great joy. It certainly has us! And be forwarned it is contagious. We moved down to a portion of the family farm in 200, my son and his family relocated in 2001, and my daughter and fher amily thereafter. I count it an incredible blessing to have that much of our family that close ~ our children are our neighbors! One lives 50 yards north of us and the other 200 yards south of us.

Sandie
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2005, 09:32 AM
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Admirer
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: southern Missouri
Posts: 187
Part 2 on the questions you asked

Okay, here are the answers to the other questions you asked but I forgot about until I reread your original question. Sorry about that ~

1. Drinking water: We live 8-1/2 miles north of town and use well water. I think, unless you are locating to a subdivision on the outskirts of a town, you will be using a well. We included a water softener and additional filters on the water source as it comes into the house to control the smell and taste. Drinking water we now buy at Wal-Mart for $.39 a gallon (refilling the gallon jugs). There is nothing wrong with our water, but we have cattle on the farm and I just prefer to drink the water from Wal-Mart.

2. Sewers: There aren't any out here! Your choice is either a logoon some distance from the house which has to be fenced or a septic system. We chose to use the pre-existing lagoon, but my son installed a septic system. We have to have the lateral line pipes leading to the lagoon "pumped out" once every couple of years, but no big deal. I just don't want grease accumulating unnecessarily in that lagoon.

Also, please realize that if you are on a septic system or a lagoon, most rural households don't have the luxury of a garbage disposal. You just use compost piles instead. (In fact, between recycling center, my compost piles, and a burning barrel, I don't even use a garbage service.) My daughter does; she has a dumpster and they come dump it once a week.

3. Critter control: ah, yes, a favorite topic to rural folks who also garden. I guess it would depend what other farm animals you want. If none, then you only have to contend with the wild critters, which in our case are possums, raccoons, coyotes, deer, rabbits (big time!), and the very obscure mountain lions and bears. BTW, I have never seen the last two but know they are in this part of the state. My biggest and most hated "critter" is snakes (copperheads and cottonmouths) and the king snakes, blue racers (those things will chase you), black snakes, etc. You just learn to look for them and you learn to avoid them.

I will mention that the raccoons, rabbits, and deer can decimate your garden in nothing flat so if you plan to garden, you have to do some type of fencing or other devices to deter them. Down here, we plan on planting some for us, some for the birds and plenty for the critters. They will surely test your patience some years!

Sandie
Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2005, 04:46 PM
ditzy46's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Groupie
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: georgia
Posts: 304
hi. I also live in a trailer. I am in rural Georgia..I am from the mean streets of New Orleans, La. We just love it here in the country. I would not go back to the city other than to visit my family. We get city water..we have a 2 bedroom 2 bath trailer and a laundry room and our water runs us $25 a month. We are on all electric and varies between $89 in the winter and $145 in the summer. We have a septic system which cost us $2,400 to install. Please check with your health department to inspect your land before you get your septic tank installed..usually cost about $35. You can't get your electricity turned on with out having your septic tank in first. Also check with your Tax Commisioner about a Homestead Exemption on your land...I forget what it all entails but It has something to do with your trailer and it is supposed to be cheaper taxes or something to that effect. Cover your land with moth balls to keep snakes away...they hate the smell of them too. We have rabbits possums, raccoons, field mice and ANTS!!!! Our trailer is up on cement blocks and tied down. As far as hurricanes and tornadoes...we try to go to a motel ...because we have pets and we won't leave them. You also need to run water lines to your trailer and you will need a power pole and an electric meter box. I hope I have covered all that you need...if I miss anything I will post again. Good luck and hope all goes smoothly for you
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2005, 04:57 PM
LuAnn's Avatar
Six Year Member
FamilyCorner Admirer
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Kentucky
Posts: 204
Well, we moved from Fort Worth and apartment living to the boonies of Kentucky to a single-wide trailer. It's definitely a fixer-upper. It's got a sewer system, but is still on its wheels, but we kind of "inherited" it, so we're not complaining.
__________________
LuAnn Chris
Brian , Benjamin , and Trinity
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2005, 05:17 PM
mom2-4's Avatar
Moderator
FamilyCorner Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: PA
Posts: 3,350
We live in a double wide mobile home on a rented lot. We do like it, but we hate renting the lot.

But, something that would make it nicer?

Let's see a poured basement would be wonderful. And yes mobile homes, can have poured basements, not just a concrete slab. This would help with storage. And when something goes wrong with the water lines. And of course cut down on the electric use for AC. I am sure this would also help to keep it warmer in winter.

Be prepared for using the AC more often, unless you are surrounded by trees.

Sorry, I can't help with all the rest of the questions!!
__________________
Karen

When I was young, I always said I wanted to be someone...I guess I should have been more specific!
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 08-13-2005, 06:14 PM
AnnaInOhio's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Ohio
Posts: 16,238
Ladies

Thanks so much for your advice... like I said it's all a bit scary. Ronsan.. snakes! Yikes. and Luann, never heard about using moth balls to keep snakes away but am willing to try it. I have 3 dogs and truly I worry more about what would happen to them than us. Dogs are curious, like to sniff and check out strange critters.

We have a year probably before we make this move but I just don't want to be considered a dumb city girl and get taken to the cleaners buying land that's not habitable. That happened to my bil years ago. He bought basicly "swamp land" and backed out of the contract. The land owner threatened to sue him but didn't. Some people are less than honest when selling land or houses including the real estate agent (don't ask, don't tell) policy.

I hope that we might be able to afford to have a basement or at least some kind of crawl space built under the trailer. I've never heard of tornadoes in Hocking Hills but they can happen anywhere, anytime.

Mom2-4

I am hoping we can find land with alot of trees. I looked at one recently that had bunches of trees and then one that only had one scrawny little tree. Bunch of tree one would've meant clearing for a living space, the other no shade. Living in a trailer park is definitely not a option, we are trying to move away from being close to other neighbors.

Take care all.

Anna
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 08-14-2005, 06:57 AM
CHADSMOM's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Fanatic
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Lake Country, Virginia
Posts: 4,346
Anna, before you purchase any land you will need a "Perk" test. It is to see if the land/soil conditions are acceptable for a septic system. If the land does not pass there are other types of sewage systems that can be used, but more costly.... This test does cost- but I'm not sure of the amount. My daughter and sil bought some land and had a double wide set there(used one) and later found out that the landowner had known that the land would not pass the Perk test. They were stuck with 3 acres... and the house had to be moved to some other land they had! You are wise in checking out all of these things first!!
__________________
To dream of the person you would like to be is to waste the person you are.

Unknown
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 08-14-2005, 02:31 PM
mom2-4's Avatar
Moderator
FamilyCorner Fanatic
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: PA
Posts: 3,350
Oh and I forgot. But, I am hoping you already thought of this.

Make sure you are going to be allowed to place a mobile home on the land that you purchase.

My sister was going to buy a piece of land once, that already had a mobile home on the lot. She was going to put a new mobile home on the lot. And lucikly before she bought the land, she found out that they no longer allow mobile homes in that area, even brand new ones!!!

I would also like to suggest to get a double wide versus a single wide. Mostly because you are already living in a house. We moved from a two story three bedroom home with a basement. Into a three bedroom double wide. And let me tell you we had to get rid of a lot of things! And still don't have enough of room. But, now we do have four kids!
__________________
Karen

When I was young, I always said I wanted to be someone...I guess I should have been more specific!
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 08-15-2005, 04:47 AM
AnnaInOhio's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Ohio
Posts: 16,238
Chadsmom

Thanks. I hadn't heard it referred to as a "Perk" but definitely would be checking into the septic. Goodness so many things to question, I will certainly be copying this entire thread before we go shopping.

Karen

Yes, my sister's property was like that. There was a old mobile home on it and it could stay but no new ones could be added. In fact, by the time they got around to building even the house zoning had changed and they had to have their blue prints revised.

We have about a year before we get serious about signing.. we have to sell at least one of our houses and fingers crossed that that happens quickly. We will use that money to buy the land and trailer, then sell our second house. This is a huge move for us though and hopping out into the unknown. It will be nice though to have what we've alway dreamed of.

Karen

You are right too about the double wide. My current house is a 2 br. ranch with a basement and porch on the front of the house. Questions come up already about where I'm going to line dry my clothes in the winter, storage for yard equipment, fencing for our dogs and garden.

Land here too is more expensive than I thought. 1-2 acres so far $18,000 to $24,000. We are trying to find in the range of $10,000 or less. As I believe Ronsan mentioned, we are trying to stay in the range of $50,000 or less total. We do not want to go in debt.

Anna
Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Food Storage For Beginners kimmyo Food Safety: Keeping Food Fresh 9 05-31-2015 05:27 AM
I need help on Decorating our Home in Country Decor Frugally!! CAGmomof2 Home Decorating & Repair 8 04-15-2002 09:03 AM
I need help on Decorating our Home in Country Decor Frugally!! CAGmomof2 Decorating - Other 4 03-08-2002 07:43 AM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 06:56 AM.


Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

POPULAR AREAS OF FAMILYCORNER.COM

Our Family FunBook is packed full of ideas from parents just like you!

Our members say that they have never found a friendlier message board community than ours!

Our kid's craft section is filled with easy ideas for creative little minds.

We have tons of free printable coloring pages to keep your little ones happy.

We offer a wide variety of free newsletters delivered right to your inbox.

Our Household Hints & Tips have a wealth of information on cleaning, organizing, and more!
Go to the funbook Go to forums Go to kid's crafts Go to printables Go to newsletters Go to Hints & Tips

Home || Newsletters || Advertising || Terms of Use || Privacy || Services || Submissions || Contact Us || Media Opportunities || Link To Us || Shop || Feedback || Staff || e-Cards || Reminder Service



FamilyCorner.com® is sponsored in part by...




Visit our friends --> MomsMenu | Main Street Mom | She Knows | Baby University | Personal Fitness Zone | iChef.com

Copyright Notice | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use/Disclaimer