Looking for a young reader program - FamilyCorner.com Forums
Visit FamilyCorner.com for tons of seasonal ideas!
quick link - go to our home page quick link - kid's crafts, family fun, printables, etc quick link - sign up for our free newsletter quick link - holiday crafts, recipes and ideas quick link - gardening, organizing, saving money, decorating and more quick link - our FunBook is filled with lots of quick ideas, tips and crafts quick link - join our bustling community of friendly members


Go Back   FamilyCorner.com Forums > >

Homeschooling Do you homeschool? Thinking about it? Join the discussion and talk to other homeschooling parents!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Rate Thread
  #1 (permalink)  
Old 10-17-2002, 08:20 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
Looking for a young reader program

My son will be 5 in 2 weeks and all of a sudden he wants to learn how to read and write. He can write all of the alphabet pretty good but he gets frustrated because he cant read the words that prints beforehand---he likes to copy words out of the newspaper...ect. Since he wont start kindergarden until next year and I dont want to discourage him from learning now, I thought that I would ask here for some advice on which way to head with this. Any suggestions?

I dont have a lot of money to put into these programs that you can buy so Im looking for an alternative method.

Id really appreciate some advice on this.

Thanks,
Tami
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Old 10-18-2002, 05:20 AM
HOMEWriter's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Groupie
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Kansas
Posts: 241
Tami,

First, I would suggest checking at your local library to see if they have either AlphaPhonics by Samuel somebody-or-other, or Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (don't know author of that one). My local library had AlphaPhonics, and I tried it with my oldest son when he was young. Unfortunately, it didn't fit his learning style, and I didn't know how to adapt it because I was new to homeschooling at the time.

I also just read a raving review for Fun Family Phonics from a woman who has just used it recently for her 6yos.

For my youngest I've just picked up one of those big workbook-type books at Sam's club. But, I just want to expose her to the letters more. Looks like your son is ready for more than that already. I think the next step you need to do with your son is reinforcing the idea that each letter makes a sound, and that when you put them together they make words.

When my children start K, I start them with Horizons Phonics, by Alpha Omega publishers.
__________________
Kelly H.
The HOMEWriter
http://www.thehomewriter.com
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Old 10-18-2002, 01:23 PM
ajrsmom's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Postaholic
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: Originally from the Home of the only 6 times Super Bowl Champs!
Posts: 11,872
Thanks Kelly


I have to make a trip to the library tomorrow to return some overdue books so Ill look those books up while Im there.

Im going to check into the Fun Family Phonics as well.

Cant hurt to see if any of these spark an interest. He has always been the type that doesnt want to learn something until he is ready and then it is full steam ahead, so Im taking the lead here.

Thanks again,
Tami
__________________


**
Visit my blogs **

Tami's Kitchen Table Talk

Simple, easy-to-cook family recipes
and lots of good conversation!

Join the Cookie Carnival!
On Hiatus

If you love baking cookies, join our group!





Reply With Quote
  #4 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2002, 11:04 AM
Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: Iowa
Posts: 9
I would second the recommendation on Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons. I used it with my daughter. We started it when she turned 5 (she had been asking since she was 3.5). We started in January and finished it in June. She is reading at least at a 2nd grade level , but probably higher. Not sure how to gauge that! It really works and only takes 15 -20 minutes per day. I believe the author is Seigfried Erdman or Erdlmann, something like that.

Alphaphonics is by Samuel Blumenfeld and is good as well. It is more helpful in the sense that is more phonics rules-based. 100 Easy Lessons don't quite hit all the phonics lessons. We homeschool and followed up this fall with Learning Language Arts Through Literature First Grade (which has been a review for her) and probably could have skipped it and went to 2nd grade language arts. Hopefully the review has helped to solidify it for her.

100 EZ Lessons retails for $20.00 but is $14.95 from www.rainbowresource.com

AlphaPhonics retails for $29.95 but is $25.95 from the website above. I think they have the best prices on it, unless you can find it somewhere else with a coupon.

Hope this helps!
Kristi
__________________
twinsmomplus1
Reply With Quote
  #5 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2002, 01:35 PM
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Admirer
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: ohio
Posts: 200
All of the above phonics programs are adequate. Just stop the lessons before the child gets bored or frustrated, to leave him wanting more!
__________________
pw
Reply With Quote
  #6 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2002, 06:17 PM
Lifestar's Avatar
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Junkie
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: I'm in a New York State of Mind
Posts: 1,823
My daughter showed early interest in reading and writing too. I am a person of modest financial means, and quite honestly, had never heard of "early reader programs" when my daughter was starting out 4 or 5 years ago.

She would pick out the letters on the tailgates of trucks, or "P-U-L-L" and P-U-S-H" on doors, "Ladies" and "Mens" room signs etc. " I would just tell her what words the letters spelled, and she would recognize the words again when we went anywhere else.

I think the single most important factor in her learning to read was that when we read books together, I had her sit next to me, and I pointed to each word as I read them. She got to see the words as she heard them pronounced. As we went through a story with repetitive words, I had her begin to read the easy ones, beginning with "I" and going to the words "in" to" "am" "at" "on" etc. Doctor Seuss books are great for this.

Eventually she began reading larger words, and reading children's dictionaries. The pictures made it easy for her to recognize what the words were spelling out, and we would discuss how each letter had it's own special sound. I worked with her on blending sounds together to sound out unfamilliar words, and she got the hang of it , especially when there was a picture involved.

A lot of her vocabulary was what they call "sight" vocabulary, rather than phonetic vocabulary. She would learn words by recognizing them, rather than by sounding them out.

She entered Kindergarten reading, and had basically taught herself. As far as writing she just coppied what ever she read. If she could say the word by reading it out loud, she was allowed to write it in her word journal. I wasn't strict about penmanship, she just took pride in being able to read what she wrote.

She is now in 3rd grade and reading on a sixth grade level. She loves to read, and her comprehensioon is so wonderful that she actually laughs, or comes to tears while reading her stories.

It has opened up the world for her and she did it on her own. All I did was what you are doing - I siezed the moment. When she was ready I went with it, and it turned out great.

Good luck with whatever method you feel will work for your family. Giving your child a head start is giving a gift that will benefit him for his whole school career.


Val
Reply With Quote
  #7 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2002, 08:01 PM
kellyandkids
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
Congratulations

Congrats - you are now a homeschooler even if you didn't mean to be. Teaching someone how to read is a thrill.

Even if you really don't want to homeschool, contact a local support group and see what they recommend. You might be able to borrow or purchase a used copy. Alternatively, ask to borrow a kit from the gov't school.

I liked 100 easy lessons myself. My kids got 2/3 through it and were off and running. Word to the wise - still get the other phonics sounds into them even if you have to do one a week.

Library carries many readers specific to a single phonics sound.

Don;t push the finger skills over the visual work or decoding.
Reply With Quote
  #8 (permalink)  
Old 10-20-2002, 09:00 PM
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Louisa, Virginia
Posts: 9
Right on Val! I was about to respond with just about everything you advised about reading until I read yours. I did everything you did with my kids and they all love to read now! I also went to the library on a weekly bases and found short, easy books which I read in the beginning and then they would "copy" what I read. Most of those stories were common like little red riding hood. Since they knew the story already they kind of ad libbed. They were so proud of themselves. I like the idea about a word journal. I didn't do that but I'll bet it was special to your kids. I think that at such a young age it's better to just take a casual concern about teaching kids to read. They will get plenty of education in school but turning reading into fun prior to school age is fun for all. I really treasured my time reading to my kids and I think it helped us to stay bonded some how. My sister never read much to her kids and none of them are really close to her now. I had the opportunity to care for her 13 year old son one summer. Believe it or not, he was always the first to try to get right next to me on our 8 ft couch to read. I could tell that he was not only starving for a good story but the closeness it provides. He began to open up to me within days after listening to me read. Something my own sister couldn't seem to do with him. At his home he is the terror of the neighborhood but at my home he is completely managable and very loving! There is more to reading then just reading!
__________________
BettyBoop
Reply With Quote
  #9 (permalink)  
Old 10-21-2002, 09:54 AM
kellyandkids
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
RIght on!

I can't read to them with their hair in my face any more but we lie side by side on the bed. Another is perfectly capable of drawing complex things while hearing every word.

A great motivator for writing practise is getting your OWN library card. The writing must be first and last name and fit in the space provided. Luckiy it is still a good sized space at our library and they could get their own cards at 4 or 5 then.
Reply With Quote
  #10 (permalink)  
Old 10-21-2002, 04:50 PM
Nine Year Member
FamilyCorner Newbie
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: England
Posts: 34
Hi
Here in England our children start school in the (school) year that they turn five, so the youngest children of that year begin when they are just 4 yrs old.

With all my children (I'm a foster carer) I make cards that I stick on the day to day items (door, window, television, chair etc) so that the children learn to recognise whole words. After a while I would take the cards off the items and let the child place them back. If children think it is a game then they learn without realising it.

My own daughter (now 35) learnt to add and subtract by using home made cards. She was shown a card with say 6 dots on and told 6. Then I showed her a number 6 and said 6, tiny babies learn to recognise groups they don't have to count the dots. Then she learnt to pick up the cards when I said the number. She then progressed to finding two cards that added up to a number. By two years old she could recognise different sets of cards that added up to the same number up to 40. She also learnt to subtract the same way. After learning that 4 cards with 5 dots, 5 cards with 4 dots, ten cards with 2 dots, 2 cards with 10 dots, all added up to 20, she then went on to picking out different numbers that together made a number eg 10, 4,1 and 5 together make 20. Before she went to school she could pick out say 8 cards that added up to 40. The main thing was that she enjoyed doing it and would get the box of cards out herself.

Marilyn from England
__________________
Your children never listen, but they sure do copy!!
Reply With Quote
 
Reply

Related Topics
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
10 Ways To Nurture Learning In Young Children ajrsmom Preschoolers & Kindergartners 1 02-14-2015 10:52 AM
email calendar program bluebird Odds & Ends of Organizing 8 04-18-2009 05:47 PM
The Dangers of Shaking Young Children ajrsmom Infants 0 09-20-2004 04:32 AM
New Food Program Reimbursement Rates JulieK Daycare Providers & Preschool Teachers 0 08-02-2004 04:05 PM
teen stiffed by church program preacherswife Teenagers 40 11-20-2002 07:52 PM



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -8. The time now is 03:11 AM.


Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.

POPULAR AREAS OF FAMILYCORNER.COM

Our Family FunBook is packed full of ideas from parents just like you!

Our members say that they have never found a friendlier message board community than ours!

Our kid's craft section is filled with easy ideas for creative little minds.

We have tons of free printable coloring pages to keep your little ones happy.

We offer a wide variety of free newsletters delivered right to your inbox.

Our Household Hints & Tips have a wealth of information on cleaning, organizing, and more!
Go to the funbook Go to forums Go to kid's crafts Go to printables Go to newsletters Go to Hints & Tips

Home || Newsletters || Advertising || Terms of Use || Privacy || Services || Submissions || Contact Us || Media Opportunities || Link To Us || Shop || Feedback || Staff || e-Cards || Reminder Service



FamilyCorner.com® is sponsored in part by...




Visit our friends --> MomsMenu | Main Street Mom | She Knows | Baby University | Personal Fitness Zone | iChef.com

Copyright Notice | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use/Disclaimer