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Old 03-05-2005, 07:16 PM
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Question growing herbs

HI! I cook at a local hospital and my supervisor is a chef. IHe's got me interested in growing some of my own herbs. For the most part, I've done okay, but it's pretty simple one, like basil, parsley, rosemary.
I would like to try fresh ginger. Can it be grown at home, or is it kind of like ginsing-doing better on it's own? If it can be grown at home, how long does it take to get a harvest?I absolutely the smell of fresh ginger-it reminds me of "pledge" dusting spray that my grandmother used when I was growing up.
Any way, I'd love to hear from someone on this. Thanks!
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Old 03-05-2005, 07:43 PM
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From ehow.com:


How to Grow Ginger
Asian cooks prize ginger not only for its tasty, bulbous roots, but also for its young, grasslike stems. Unless you live in the hottest part of the United States (USDA zone 10), you'll have to grow this tender herb in a pot and bring it indoors in cold weather.

Growing Ginger in a Container

Steps:
1. Buy fresh ginger roots at a grocery store or an Asian market. Look for fat tubers with numerous buds.

2. Plant ginger in spring when you can supply warm enough temperatures, whether indoors or out. The dormant tubers will sprout only when the mercury hits 75 to 85 degrees F.

3. Use a container that's about 14 inches across and 12 inches deep and has excellent drainage. This size will hold three average-size tubers comfortably.

4. Fill the container with potting soil enriched with plenty of compost.

5. Soak the tubers in warm water overnight, then set them in the pot just below the soil surface, spacing them evenly, with the buds facing up.

6. Set the container in light shade, indoors or out, depending on the temperature.

7. Water lightly at first, then more heavily when growth starts. Keep plants dry in winter, when they're dormant.

8. Move plants outside only when the temperatures have reached 50 degrees F. In cooler weather, growth can be stunted.

9. Shield plants from high winds, and move them indoors at the first sign of cool temperatures.

10. Expect plants to reach maturity, and a height of 2 to 4 feet, in 10 months to a year.

11. Dig up new, young sprouts that appear in front of the main plants (they form their own tubers), use what you need, and freeze or replant the rest.

12. Clip young, tender stems anytime.


Tips:
In its native tropics, where ginger is grown commercially, the foliage withers after about 10 months and the roots are harvested.

If you grow ginger in a greenhouse, you might be treated to its seldom-seen blooms: exotic-looking, usually pink flowers that resemble miniature pineapples.


Warnings:
Don't confuse the herb ginger (Zingiber officinale) with wild ginger (Asarum canadense), which is a hardy ornamental ground cover.

Growing Ginger Outdoors in USDA Zone 10

Steps:
1. Buy fresh ginger roots at a grocery store or an Asian market. Look for fat tubers with numerous buds.

2. Choose a lightly shaded site with rich, moist but well-drained soil. Work in plenty of compost to ensure the right combination.

3. Plant ginger in spring when temperatures are 75 to 85 degrees F. Soak the tubers in warm water overnight, then set them just under the soil surface with the buds facing up.

4. Water lightly at first, then more heavily when growth starts.

5. Shield plants from high winds, and cover them if temperatures dip lower than normal.

6. Expect plants to reach maturity, and a height of 2 to 4 feet, in 10 months to a year.

7. Dig up new, young sprouts that appear in front of the main plants (they form their own tubers), use what you need, and freeze or replant the rest.

8. Clip young, tender stems anytime.


http://www.ehow.com/how_318_grow-ginger.html
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Old 03-05-2005, 07:47 PM
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One more article:

GINGER: THE UNDERGROUND SPICE

For Release 06/02/03

AL FERRER
SEMINOLE CO. URBAN HORTICULTURIST


GINGER: THE UNDERGROUND SPICE

Ginger is a perennial plant whose underground rhizomes are used as a flavoring agent. It produces well from Homestead to Pensacola. The plant grows from thick, white, tuberous, underground rhizomes that are very aromatic and is native to Taiwan and Haiti. It has been grown for centuries in the Caribbean Islands and China where it is used locally for medicine and in cooking. It is marketed in United States mostly in a powdered and candied form. Gardeners report growing ginger satisfactorily for home use throughout the state.
Description: True ginger can be distinguished by its shorter stalks, which are 2 to 3 feet high, with narrow, flat, pointed leaf blades about 1 foot long, producing yellow-green flowers with purple tips growing in dense spikes. It produces plump, strongly aromatic rhizomes that are used mainly as food flavoring. True ginger is often confused with related plants grown as ornamentals in Florida, such as the butterfly ginger, shell flower and the pinecone ginger. The roots of all gingerís are edible and have varying degrees of hotness, like peppers.
Culture: Ginger does best in partial to complete shade. In full sun, the leaves are brown-tipped and the plants grow poorly. Most good garden soils are adequate for growing ginger, including sands, if sufficiently supplied with nutrients and moisture. Soil should be 8 inches deep and contain a mixture of sand and cow manure, or other suitable organic mixture. Ginger is started from rhizome (root) cuttings rather than from seed. The tuberous root, called a hand, can be purchased in grocery stores, nurseries or health food stores. In selecting fresh ginger for planting, choose a fat, full hand with well-defined eyes. The eyes resemble those of a potato and are easy to detect. It is best to cut the rhizomes into pieces 1 to 1Ĺ inches long, each containing at least one eye. Cut the rhizome pieces a few days ahead of planting to allow the cut surfaces to dry, reducing chances of rotting. In a well-prepared bed, insert each piece and cover with about 1 inch of soil. Space them 15 inches in the row and 15 inches between the row. Early in the spring is the best time to plant. All gingerís are heavy feeders, they should be fertilized with a good, all-purpose formula monthly during their growing season, and should be watered regularly. Ginger will produce new rhizomes but no seeds where summers are warm and last five to eight months. Ginger will tolerate temperatures in the low 20s without serious damage. It will come back each spring with the return of warm weather if frozen back during the winter months.
Harvesting and use: To harvest, dig rhizomes in the fall or when the tops have died down. Tops of the plants will die back 9 to 11 months after planting for a natural dormancy. Allow rhizomes to dry in the shade for about a week. In Jamaica, the rhizomes are peeled, washed, and sun-dried. Since ginger is a major spice, it has many uses as a food, flavoring, and medicinal product. Candied ginger is peeled, boiled, soaked in syrup, and then rolled in sugar. Ginger is the source of flavoring for our gingerbread and Ginger Ale. It has been a staple in Chinese cooking for centuries. Ginger tea is considered a mild and safe stimulant as long as one drinks only a cup or two a day. The leaves and cone-like flowerheads can be used in flower arrangements.
Ornamental gingerís: Pinecone ginger or lanolin lily is about 5 or 6 feet tall, produces deep red cones by Christmas. Butterfly ginger lily grows around 3 to 6 feet tall, with wonderfully fragrant flowers. The blossoms are edible and have a ginger-mint flavor.


http://www.seminolecountyfl.gov/lls/...?articleID=122
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Old 03-07-2005, 05:44 PM
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ginger

Thank you. I appreciate your help and the links> I look forward to getting it started. I hope that I can keep Mother from pulling it up. I've had rosemary for the last two years-the first year, my dad pulled it up, so I showed him which one I wanted kept when I replanted, then when I checked on it again, Mother had gotten to it.! Oh well. Thanks again!
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Old 06-23-2005, 10:42 AM
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Old 04-06-2008, 11:59 AM
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Originally posted by midnightmama214 on another thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by midnightmama214
Hi All Thank You For The Warm Welcome . I Am Dreaming Of Spring And The Gardins. I Have A Hint Or 2 For Those Of You Planting Herbs. 1. Never Plant Spermint, Peppermint,or Lemonbalm Side By Side. They Will Cross Pollinate And In A Few Years They Will All Taste The Same. Give Them Some Distance From Each Other.
2. Take A 5 Galon Plastic Pail And Cut The Bottom Out Of It, Make Some Holes In The Sides Of It, Then Sink It In The Ground To About 2 Inches Above Ground Level. Wrap Several Layers Of Newspaper Around The Ouside Of The Whole Pail, And A Few Layers Around The Inside Of The Pail. Fill In Around The Pail, And Fill The Pail With Good Draining Planting Soil. Then Plant Your Mints Or Lemon Balm. This Will Keep Them From Spreading. The Bottom Of The Pail Being Open Reduces The Amount Of Watering A Container Would Need And Prevents Over Watering As Do The Holes In Ths Sides. The Paper Around Both The Inside And Outside Of The Pail Draw Water To The Plant Roots. The Paper Around The Outside Of The Pail Also Prevents The Roots From Growing Through The Holes.
3. I Usually Put Several Layers Of Paper On Top Of The Ground About 1 And 1/2 Feet Around The Pail And Cover This With Small Stones Or Bark. This Keeps Down The Weeds And Stops The Herb From Reseeding.
4. Plant Your Herbs In With Or Near Other Things. They Discourage Bugs Etc. I Put Basil Next To My Tomatoes And Now Get 4 Times As Many Tomatoes With No Stem Rot Or Blight.
5.remember "the Grass Is Always Greener Over The Septic Tank" --erma Bombeck. Put Some Fertilizer At The Bottom Of The Holes You Dig For Your Plants Cover It With Some Soil So As Not To Burn The Roots. It Helps Them Alot. Hope These Hints Are Helpful And You All Get Good Gardins
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Old 08-09-2008, 05:24 AM
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I have a sweet basil plant and I'm looking for some help in how to grow it.

Where to plant it, should I plant this in a pot etc...
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Old 08-02-2015, 05:24 AM
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