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Old 06-02-2009, 01:57 PM
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Dried Sweet Corn Nothing Like It In The Whole World

The best way of handling sweet corn when it is ready is to dry it. Years ago they had no cans or freezers. First it is plunged into a large covered kettle of boiling water for five miutes to set the milk in the kernels, then into cold water to stop the cooking. After the corn is cooled enough to handle, cut the kernels off the cob, holding the ear upright by the little stump and using a sharp paring knife to cut downward toward the tip end being careful not to cut too close to the cob. Then with the back of the knife blade thoroughly scrape the cob to get out all the milk and kernel hearts. Up to this point it is prepared the same way as for canning or freezing.

After it is all off the cobs, spread out evenly in large enamel trays. Once the trays are spread to a depth of one to 1- 1 1/2 inches with the oven set at warm, they are slid into the oven and left for two or three nights, or until the corn is thoroughly dried.

When the corn is finished and ready to store, you will be surprised how much it has shrunk. It may be as much as half its original bulk. Gallon jars hold the equivalent of five dozen ears each. A huge saving of can space. Freezer space too. Thik of the amount of space taken by five dozen roasting ears.
Coffee cans would serve as well. Even plastic bags are convenient, and easily stored.

The early settlers considered it a holiday delicacy. No thanksgiving dinner was complete without it.
Does anyone dry their extra corns?
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Last edited by Sueanne; 06-02-2009 at 02:03 PM.
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Old 06-03-2009, 05:37 AM
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I've never had luck growing corn, can't get full ears where our garden is. I'll have to try drying some when the local corn is in season. I'm sure it will be better then frozen in the winter.

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Old 06-03-2009, 08:15 AM
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We freeze sweet corn every year. In the past I have left the sweet corn that we did not harvest for freezing on the stalk and let it dry naturally. In the fall I pick the ears and shell the dry kernels off the cob. Sometimes it requires some additional drying on my part. I normally just put the shelled kernels on a cookie sheet and then place them in a low oven for a few hours (time depends on the moisture in the corn) I store the dry corn and grind it in my blender until it is a chunky cornmeal consistency. I use it in several recipes to replace part of cornmeal in corn muffins and corn bread. It has a nutty taste than regular cornmeal---Yum!!
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Old 06-03-2009, 12:00 PM
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Cooking Dried Sweet Corn

Here is a recipe that is used today for cooking the dried corn.

Add to 1 cup dried corn
2 cups cold water
Soak 2 hours or so. Do not drain

Add 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1 tblsp. honey
pepper to taste
Cover and cook slowly until the kernels are tender [50 to 60 minutes].Add butter . Serve in sauce dishes, broth and all. 2 tblsp. milk may be added if you like. Serves 4 to 6.

This is simply the basic recipe for serving dried sweet corn as a vegetable. It can be used in casserols, omelets, mixed with other vegetables or in salads and even desserts such as puddings. Its nutty flavor is pungent and aromatic.

Hope this helps since there are few cookbooks that give many recipes how to use it.
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Last edited by Sueanne; 06-03-2009 at 12:03 PM.
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Old 06-03-2009, 08:36 PM
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Sueanne --- That sounds good.
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Old 06-04-2009, 11:44 AM
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Joy...Just watched a program on tv this morning in my area where they were picking the corn and eating it raw. Said it was tender when first picked. Do You grow your own corn? Never knew the silks were attached to each kernel of corn. They were using human hair to deter animals from eating it. I have been cooking my corn on the cob husked in the microwave in a covered dish takes only a couple of minutes.
I add cornmeal to my waffle batter, even mix with breadcrumbs for fish. I am thinking of drying some corn now that it is in season for later use too. Bet putting it outside in my electric toaster oven it would heat up in no time with the florida sun.
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Old 06-04-2009, 12:06 PM
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Sueanne---I do have a few rows of sweet corn in my garden so we have some to eat fresh, but we plant sweet corn in the field with the planter too. When the guys finish planting the field corn, they empty the boxes and plant a few rows of sweet corn in the field. We plant enough of several families to freeze all the corn they need. I usually freeze about 100 pts each year.
My Dh has eaten a raw ear right out of the garden before. He said it is good, but I have never tried it.
I have heard of using hair to help keep animals out of the corn, but I am not sure how good it works. I do know someone who has her hairdresser save her clipping so she can use them in her garden.
This is corn country and pollinating time can be very nerve racking for farmers who are worrying about the weather conditions. Ideally when the corn is pollinating you want humid or damp conditions so when the pollen falls from the tassel the silks are sticky enough to catch it. A good pollinating season means nice full ears.
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Last edited by Joy; 06-04-2009 at 12:08 PM.
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